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Report: Sony emails show U.S. officials blessed Kim Jong-Un killing in 'The Interview'

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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According to multiple media reports Wednesday, emails indicate the Sony CEO showed a rough cut of “The Interview” to U.S. government officials before moving ahead with the movie’s release.

The Daily Beast and Reuters claim to have seen several emails that reveal two U.S. officials in June screened and OK’d the movie in which North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is assassinated. Sony was the victim of a massive computer system hack and the hackers have been releasing sensitive emails on the Internet.

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The fallout from the Sony Pictures Entertainment hack that began four weeks ago exploded Tuesday after the shadowy group calling themselves Guardians of Peace escalated their attack beyond corporate espionage and threatened moviegoers with violence reminiscent of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

According to the Daily Beast, the claim that the State Department played a role in the decision to include the film’s death scene is likely to further upset Pyongyang. The Daily Beast is reporting it has seen emails between Sony CEO Michael Lynton and a security consultant that appear to suggest the U.S. government saw "The Interview" as a useful propaganda tool against the North Korean regime.

Speculation about a North Korean link to the Sony hacking has centered on that country's angry denunciation of the film. Over the summer, North Korea warned that the film's release would be an "act of war that we will never tolerate." It said the U.S. will face "merciless" retaliation.

The Department of Homeland Security has said that there is no credible intelligence to indicate a threat, but is still investigating the message.

Read the full Daily Beast story

Thinking of snapping a voter selfie? Think again

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If you’re on social media, there's a good chance that some of your friends will post -- or try to post -- a photo of themselves voting. Or maybe you will.

But in some states, it could warrant a jail sentence. In others, like New York, there’s no law against it.

Florida law, for example, prohibits photography in the polling place and poll clerks will remind voters if they see them taking a picture, said Bill Cowles, supervisor of elections for Orange County.

Cowles said Orange County poll clerks have been trained to be on the look-out for voters snapping photos and will remind them not to do it again.

LINK: Read the law here

University of Central Florida student Ashlee Holloway waited until she was out of the voting booth and away from the polling site before she took a selfie with her "I Voted" sticker.

"I just wanted to prove to my mom that I voted. She was on me today like, 'Get up and vote,'" said Holloway.

Holloway said she didn't think it would be appropriate to take a photo while voting.

"It just seems like it's very roped off and it's very serious for a reason," said Central Florida student Joanna Gill.

News cameras are not allowed inside polling locations.

In New Hampshire, a law banning “ballot selfies” is being challenged by a lawsuit alleging that it compromises the right of free political speech in the state, according to Reuters.

#VoterSelfies have been big on social media on Election Day, but for now, be mindful that they’re not allowed inside a voting area in Florida. It could get you in trouble.

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