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Photos: Notable deaths 2017

WATCH: Jimmy Kimmel holds infant son during tearful monologue about children's health care

On Monday, late-night host Jimmy Kimmel delivered an emotional monologue while holding his 7-month-old son, Billy, after taking a week off as the baby boy recovered from heart surgery.

>> Jimmy Kimmel: Senator ‘lied right to my face’ about health care

A tearful Kimmel asked lawmakers to restore the Children's Health Insurance Program, which expired two months ago.

>> Round 3: Jimmy Kimmel continues criticism of GOP’s health-care bill

"This is literally a life-and-death program for American kids," Kimmel said. "It’s always had bipartisan support, but this year, they let the money for it expire while they work on getting tax cuts for their billionaire and millionaire donors."

>> Read more trending news  

He continued: "And imagine getting that letter, literally not knowing how you will be able to afford to save your child’s life. It's not a hypothetical. About 2 million CHIP kids have serious chronic conditions. I don’t know about you, I’ve had enough of this. I don’t know what could be more disgusting than putting a tax cut that mostly goes to rich people ahead of the lives of children."

>> Watch the clip here

Kimmel's son, who was born with congenital heart disease, has had two heart surgeries and will have another at age 6, according to his show's YouTube page.

Late-night host Kimmel holds son, pleads for health care

Jimmy Kimmel held his baby son as he returned to his late-night show after a week off for the boy's heart surgery.

Kimmel was crying from the first moment of his monologue Monday night as he pleaded with Congress to restore and improve children's health coverage, a cause he has championed since his son Billy was born with a heart defect in April.

Billy needed one surgery just after his birth and had a follow-up operation last week.

Kimmel kept up his ardent advocacy Monday night, urging Congress to restore the Children's Health Insurance Program, which has been left unfunded and stuck in a political stalemate since September.

Kimmel said it's "disgusting" that Congress is putting tax cuts for millionaires ahead of the lives of children.

Merriam-Webster's word of the year for 2017: 'Feminism'

This may or may not come as a surprise: Merriam-Webster's word of the year for 2017 is "feminism."

Yes, it's been a big year or two or 100 for the word. In 2017, lookups for feminism increased 70 percent over 2016 on Merriam-Webster.com and spiked several times after key events, lexicographer Peter Sokolowski, the company's editor at large, told The Associated Press ahead of Tuesday's annual word reveal.

There was the Women's March on Washington in January, along with sister demonstrations around the globe. And heading into the year was Democrat Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and references linking her to white-clad suffragettes, along with her loss to President Donald Trump, who once boasted about grabbing women.

The "Me Too" movement rose out of Harvey Weinstein's dust, and other "silence breakers" brought down rich and famous men of media, politics and the entertainment worlds.

Feminism has been in Merriam-Webster's annual Top 10 for the last few years, including sharing word-of-the-year honors with other "isms" in 2015. Socialism, fascism, racism, communism, capitalism and terrorism rounded out the bunch. Surreal was the word of the year last year.

"The word feminism was being use in a kind of general way," Sokolowski said by phone from the company's headquarters in Springfield, Massachusetts. "The feminism of this big protest, but it was also used in a kind of specific way: What does it mean to be a feminist in 2017? Those kinds of questions are the kinds of things, I think, that send people to the dictionary."

Feminism's roots are in the Latin for "woman" and the word "female," which dates to 14th century English. Sokolowski had to look no further than his company's founder, Noah Webster, for the first dictionary reference, in 1841, which isn't all that old in the history of English.

"It was a very new word at that time," Sokolowski said. "His definition is not the definition that you and I would understand today. His definition was, 'The qualities of females,' so basically feminism to Noah Webster meant femaleness. We do see evidence that the word was used in the 19th century in a medical sense, for the physical characteristics of a developing teenager, before it was used as a political term, if you will."

Webster added the word in revisions to his "An American Dictionary of the English Language." They were his last. He died in 1843. He also added the word terrorism that year.

"We had no idea he was the original dictionary source of feminism. We don't have a lot of evidence of what he was looking at," Sokolowski said.

Today, Merriam-Webster defines feminism as the "theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes" and "organized activities on behalf of women's rights and interests."

Another spike for the word feminism in 2017 occurred in February, after Kellyanne Conway spoke at the Conservative Political Action Committee.

"It's difficult for me to call myself a feminist in the classic sense because it seems to be very anti-male and it certainly seems to be very pro-abortion. I'm neither anti-male or pro-abortion," she said. "There's an individual feminism, if you will, that you make your own choices. ... I look at myself as a product of my choices, not a victim of my circumstances. And to me, that's what conservative feminism is all about."

She was applauded, and she sent many people to their dictionaries, Sokolowski said. The company would not release actual lookup numbers.

Other events that drew interest to the word feminism was the popular Hulu series, "The Handmaid's Tale," and the blockbuster movie, "Wonder Woman," directed by a woman, Patty Jenkins, Sokolowski said.

Merriam-Webster had nine runners-up, in no particular order:

— Complicit , competitor Dictionary.com's word of the year.

— Recuse , in reference to Jeff Sessions and the Russia investigation.

— Empathy , which hung high all year.

— Dotard , used by Kim Jong-un to describe Trump.

— Syzygy , the nearly straight-line configuration of three celestial bodies, such as the sun, moon and earth during a solar or lunar eclipse.

— Gyro , which can be pronounced three different ways, a phenom celebrated in a Jimmy Fallon sketch on "The Tonight Show."

— Federalism , which Lindsey Graham referred to in discussing the future of the Affordable Care Act.

— Hurricane , which Sokolowski suspects is because people are confused about wind speed.

— Gaffe , such as what happened at the Academy Awards when the wrong best picture winner was announced. That was a go-to word for the media, Sokolowski said.

'Endless Summer' surf film director Bruce Brown dies at 80

Bruce Brown, who molded the modern image of surfer as seeker and transformed the sport with his 1966 surfing documentary "The Endless Summer," has died He was 80.

Alex Mecl, general manager of Bruce Brown Films, said Brown died of natural causes in Santa Barbara, California on Sunday.

Along with the music of the Beach Boys, Brown took surfing from a quirky hobby to a fundamental part of American culture.

Surfers had largely been portrayed as beach blanket buffoons in the mindless party movies of the early 1960s.

Then came Brown and "The Endless Summer" with his beautiful, soulful story of surfers on a quest for fulfillment — an image that became emblazoned on the cultural psyche.

"Thank you for showing us the world as you saw it, Bruce Brown," Kelly Slater, 11-time world champion surfer, said in an Instagram post Monday. "There are never enough words to say goodbye properly."

Brown, who took up surfing in the early 1950s, had made five other documentaries about the sport before "Endless Summer," including 1958's "Slippery When Wet" and 1960's "Barefoot Adventure."

Like all the others it was shot on a tiny budget with Brown performing nearly every duty, from camera man to narrator.

The film follows two surfers, Robert August and Mike Hynson, as they hop hemispheres to constantly surf wherever it is summer, from Hawaii to Australia to South Africa to Senegal.

Surfers considered Brown a peer who just happened to carry a camera instead of a board. He shot the film loosely and casually and the style proved infectious when the public saw the movie.

"I never had formal training in filmmaking, and that probably worked to my advantage," Brown said in a 2004 interview for his film company's website.

The trio's charisma and — the film's natural beauty — made it an unlikely hit.

"The beautiful photography he brought home almost makes you wonder if Hollywood hasn't been trying too hard," Roger Ebert said in his 1967 review of the film in The Chicago Sun-Times.

The film inspired many surfers to leave their home beaches, drop out of their sedentary lives, and seek isolated places with bigger waves.

Some surfers blame Brown's film for turning their serene spots into forever crowded hotspots.

"A lot of people try to make me feel guilty about that," Brown said in the 2004 interview, "and while I'm sure 'Endless Summer' hurried it up, the sport was growing by leaps and bounds simply because it's so much fun. No one could have stopped it."

Brown went on to make many other documentaries, most notably the 1971 film "On Any Sunday," which gave the same treatment to motorcycle riding as "Endless Summer" did to surfing. A sequel, "On Any Sunday II," was released in 1981.

In 1994, he revisited his classic and made "The Endless Summer II" with his filmmaker son Dana Brown.

In 2009, he narrated a surfing-themed episode of "SpongeBob SquarePants" called "SpongeBob vs. The Big One."

Brown was born in San Francisco and raised in Long Beach.

He retired to a ranch near Santa Barbara, putting down the camera to ride motorcycles and surf.

CAA to form legal defense fund for harassment victims

The powerful Hollywood talent agency CAA is canceling its annual Golden Globe Awards party and planning to form a legal defense fund to assist workplace harassment victims across all industries.

A person with knowledge of the plans who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly said Monday that the funds normally used for the Globes party, which would celebrate nominated clients like Meryl Streep, Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman and Tom Hanks, will be instead be redirected to establish the fund.

The agency has also committed itself to establishing gender parity in its leadership by the year 2020, following the lead of ICM Partners.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

The Golden Globes will be handed out Jan. 7 and will be followed by several after-parties.

Another star reporter, this time at the New Yorker, out after ‘improper sexual conduct’

The New Yorker has fired its Washington correspondent, Ryan Lizza, over what the magazine called “improper sexual conduct.”

>> Read more trending news

New Yorker officials said in a statement that they recently learned of the “improper” conduct and made the decision to let Lizza go.

“We have reviewed the matter and, as a result, have severed ties with Lizza,” according to the magazine’s statement.

It’s unclear what the “improper sexual conduct” refers to, but Lizza issued a statement denying any improprieties.

“I am dismayed that The New Yorker has decided to characterize a respectful relationship with a woman I dated as somehow inappropriate. The New Yorker was unable to cite any company policy that was violated,” Lizza said.

Lizza, who has worked at the magazine for the past decade, apologized to his family and colleagues for any embarrassment, but said The New Yorker was wrong.

“This decision, which was made hastily and without a full investigation of the relevant facts, was a terrible mistake,” Lizza said.

The New Yorker hasn’t revealed any details of the complaint against Lizza and apparently has no plans to do so.

“Due to a request for privacy, we are not commenting further,” according to the magazine’s statement.

>> Related: Charlie Rose fired from CBS amid sexual harassment allegations; PBS cuts ties with newsman

Lizza’s termination follows other recent high-profile firings over allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct, including former “Today” show anchor Matt Lauer, former CBS “This Morning” anchor Charlie Rose and New York Times reporter Glenn Thrush.

Box office top 20: 'Coco' tops charts for third weekend

With "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" set to open this weekend, Disney and Pixar's "Coco" topped the quiet box office charts for the third time in a row.

The animated flick earned $18.5 million this weekend, and the only new wide release, "Just Getting Started" starring Morgan Freeman, opened in 10th place with a lackluster $3.2 million.

Holdovers mostly populated the top five, with "Justice League" in second place with $9.7 million, "Wonder" in third with $8.4 million, and "Thor: Ragnarok" in fifth place with $6.3 million. No. 4 was "The Disaster Artist," which performed well in its expansion to 840 theaters, bringing in just under $6.4 million.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore:

1. "Coco," Disney, $18,452,315, 3,748 locations, $4,923 average, $135,658,005, 3 weeks.

2. "Justice League," Warner Bros., $9,664,297, 3,508 locations, $2,755 average, $212,129,668, 4 weeks.

3. "Wonder," Lionsgate, $8,447,762, 3,519 locations, $2,401 average, $100,300,868, 4 weeks.

4. "The Disaster Artist," A24, $6,366,243, 840 locations, $7,579 average, $7,963,017, 2 weeks.

5. "Thor: Ragnarok," Disney, $6,271,374, 3,047 locations, $2,058 average, $301,136,438, 6 weeks.

6. "Daddy's Home 2," Paramount, $5,919,337, 3,263 locations, $1,814 average, $91,078,796, 5 weeks.

7. "Murder On The Orient Express," 20th Century Fox, $5,162,331, 3,089 locations, $1,671 average, $92,769,846, 5 weeks.

8. "The Star," Sony, $3,707,087, 2,976 locations, $1,246 average, $32,311,133, 4 weeks.

9. "Lady Bird," A24, $3,451,822, 1,557 locations, $2,217 average, $22,235,491, 6 weeks.

10. "Just Getting Started," Broad Green Pictures, $3,201,459, 2,161 locations, $1,481 average, $3,201,459, 1 week.

11. "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri," Fox Searchlight, $2,862,109, 1,620 locations, $1,767 average, $18,312,393, 5 Weeks.

12. "A Bad Moms Christmas," STX Entertainment, $2,581,446, 2,124 locations, $1,215 average, $68,702,052, 6 weeks.

13. "The Shape Of Water," Fox Searchlight, $1,141,546, 41 locations, $27,843 average, $1,372,554, 2 weeks.

14. "Roman J. Israel, Esq.," Sony, $871,624, 1,453 locations, $600 average, $11,209,149, 4 weeks.

15. "Darkest Hour," Focus Features, $741,417, 53 locations, $13,989 average, $1,196,325, 3 weeks.

16. "The Man Who Invented Christmas," Bleecker Street, $715,800, 720 locations, $994 average, $4,346,405, 3 weeks.

17. "Call Me By Your Name," Sony Pictures Classics, $285,850, 9 locations, $31,761 average, $1,367,155, 3 weeks.

18. "Blade Runner 2049," Warner Bros., $264,527, 388 locations, $682 average, $91,252,390, 10 weeks.

19. "I, Tonya," Neon Rated, $264,155, 4 locations, $66,039 average, $264,155, 1 week.

20. "The Mountain Between Us," 20th Century Fox, $244,829, 535 locations, $458 average, $30,191,120, 10 weeks.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

New Yorker fires reporter Ryan Lizza for sexual misconduct

The New Yorker magazine said Monday it has cut ties with well-known political reporter Ryan Lizza for alleged sexual misconduct.

The magazine recently learned Lizza had "engaged in what we believe was improper sexual conduct," a spokeswoman said. After reviewing the matter, it cut ties with the reporter.

Lizza is also a contributor on CNN. A spokeswoman for the cable news network said he will not appear on air while it looks into the matter.

Lizza called that the New Yorker's decision a "terrible mistake" made without a full investigation.

"I am dismayed that The New Yorker has decided to characterize a respectful relationship with a woman I dated as somehow inappropriate," Lizza said in an emailed statement, adding that the magazine did not cite any company policy that was violated.

He apologized to "friends, workplace colleagues, and loved ones for any embarrassment this episode may cause."

A lawyer representing the woman making the allegations against Lizza, however, disputed his description of the relationship.

Douglas Wigdor, who has brought a string of sexual-harassment and discrimination cases against Fox News, said "in no way did Mr. Lizza's misconduct constitute a 'respectful relationship' as he has now tried to characterize it."

Wigdor said the woman wishes for her identity to remain confidential. She reported his actions in order to hold him accountable and "in the hope that by coming forward she would help other potential victims," he said.

Lizza had been the New Yorker's Washington correspondent since 2007. He is known for a memorable July interview with Anthony Scaramucci , in which the former White House communications director bashed colleagues in vulgar language. Scaramucci was ousted shortly afterward.

Lizza's ouster from the New Yorker comes amid in a wave of allegations against powerful men in media, entertainment, politics and other industries that have followed the accusations published against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein in October.

Also on Monday, celebrity chef Mario Batali stepped away from his restaurant empire and cooking show after reports of sexual misconduct.

Family, friends celebrate Kirk Douglas’s 101st year

Kirk Douglas had a lot of help to blow out his many birthday candles over the weekend.

Deadline Hollywood reported that the Hollywood legend rang in 101 years on Saturday at his Beverly Hills home and was showered with tributes from his famous family. 

>> Read more trending news

The senior Douglas’ 17-year-old grandson, Dylan Douglas, posted a photo on an Instagram of himself planting a peck on his grandfather’s face.

“Happy birthday 101 years and still sexy love you with all my heart Pappy,” Dylan captioned the photo.

Dylan’s mother, actress Catherine Zeta-Jones, offered her own well wishes for her father-in-law. She shared a photo on Instagram of Douglas and herself with the caption, “101 today!!!! My darling Pappy on my knee. Happy Birthday to my wonderful, inspirational and loving father in law, Kirk. Love you with all my heart.”

Zeta-Jones’ posts came in lieu of her presence at Douglas’s lunchtime birthday bash, but she definitely didn’t miss out on singing her father-in-law a personalized rendition of “Happy Birthday” through FaceTime, according to The Daily Mail

In addition to his 73-year-old son, Michael Douglas, — who flew in and out of the celebration to rejoin his son Cameron at the birth of his granddaughter — Kirk was joined in celebration by his wife of 63 years, Anne, 98, nieces and nephews and Hollywood bigwigs. 

Douglas’ family presented him with a bright, sunflower-patterned cake with his age written in frosting, and his cardiologist allowed the “Spartacus” star to enjoy his yearly, physician-permitted shot of vodka, according to Deadline

Born on Dec. 9, 1916, Kirk Douglas has enjoyed a storied career spanning several decades. The veteran was known for playing the title character from “Ulysses” (1954), starring in “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” (1954) and his famed role as “Spartacus” (1960). 

Considering the 101-year-old actor was up and dancing just last year, he’s still got plenty of youth left inside.

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