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Sanders and Giuliani among guests on Sunday's news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — Giuliani; Robby Mook, Clinton campaign manager.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Pre-empted by NFL coverage.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sanders, Giuliani.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.

Philadelphia Orchestra goes on strike, cancels opening gala

The Philadelphia Orchestra has gone on strike, canceling an opening night performance that about 1,000 people had come to hear.

Philly.com reports (http://bit.ly/2dgQZRh ) that the 96 musicians and two librarians who belong to American Federation of Musicians Local 77 decided to strike about an hour before curtain time on Friday. Last-minute efforts to reach an agreement failed during back stage talks.

Orchestra president Allison B. Vulgamore appeared on stage about 20 minutes before the concert was to begin and told the audience there would be no performance because a labor agreement wasn't in place for "one of the world's greatest orchestras, if not the greatest."

After the audience left the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, musicians came out carrying picket signs.

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Information from: Philly.com, http://www.philly.com/

Philadelphia Orchestra goes on strike, cancels opening gala

The Philadelphia Orchestra has gone on strike, canceling an opening night performance that about 1,000 people had come to hear.

Philly.com reports (http://bit.ly/2dgQZRh ) that the 96 musicians and two librarians who belong to American Federation of Musicians Local 77 decided to strike about an hour before curtain time on Friday. Last-minute efforts to reach an agreement failed during back stage talks.

Orchestra president Allison B. Vulgamore appeared on stage about 20 minutes before the concert was to begin and told the audience there would be no performance because a labor agreement wasn't in place for "one of the world's greatest orchestras, if not the greatest."

After the audience left the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, musicians came out carrying picket signs.

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Information from: Philly.com, http://www.philly.com/

Former 'Power Rangers' actor pleads not guilty to murder

A former "Power Rangers" actor charged with stabbing his California roommate to death with a sword has pleaded not guilty to murder.

City News Service says Ricardo Medina entered the plea in Lancaster. He could face 26 years to life in prison if convicted.

Prosecutors say Medina stabbed Joshua Sutter several times in the abdomen last year at their house in Green Valley, a mountain town north of Los Angeles.

The two allegedly were arguing over Medina's girlfriend.

Authorities say after the attack, Medina called 911 and waited for police to arrive.

Medina played the Red Lion Wild Force Ranger on "Power Rangers Wild Force" in 2002. He was the voice of Deker on "Power Rangers Samurai" in 2011 and 2012.

Damon Gupton joins cast of 'Criminal Minds'

Damon Gupton has joined the cast of "Criminal Minds" after Thomas Gibson was fired last month.

CBS announced Friday that Gupton's character will be introduced in this season's eighth episode.

Gupton will play a special agent from the behavioral analysis program of the FBI's counterintelligence division. The network described the character as a "seasoned profiler who will bring his spy-hunting skill set to the behavioral analysis unit."

Gupton's credits include "Whiplash," ''La La Land," ''Bates Motel" and "Prime Suspect."

Thomas Gibson was fired from the long-running CBS drama after he was involved with a physical altercation between him and another member of the "Criminal Minds" company.

Damon Gupton joins cast of 'Criminal Minds'

Damon Gupton has joined the cast of "Criminal Minds" after Thomas Gibson was fired last month.

CBS announced Friday that Gupton's character will be introduced in this season's eighth episode.

Gupton will play a special agent from the behavioral analysis program of the FBI's counterintelligence division. The network described the character as a "seasoned profiler who will bring his spy-hunting skill set to the behavioral analysis unit."

Gupton's credits include "Whiplash," ''La La Land," ''Bates Motel" and "Prime Suspect."

Thomas Gibson was fired from the long-running CBS drama after he was involved with a physical altercation between him and another member of the "Criminal Minds" company.

Mexico prosecutors eye son in killing of film director, wife

The murder of film director Leon Serment and his producer wife's subsequent death are believed to have been contract killings arranged by their son for the equivalent of about $5,200 per victim, Mexico City's top prosecutor said Friday.

Prosecutor Rodolfo Rios alleged at a news conference that the unnamed son and his girlfriend were the "intellectual authors" of the murders and said four suspects, including those who ordered and those who carried out the killings, were arrested Thursday.

The alleged plot was said to have been planned over the course of two months.

Serment directed the 2010 film "Tequila Effect," a thriller about the 1994 peso crisis. He was killed by two attackers while returning with his son to his home in the capital the night of Aug. 27, in what was believed at the time to have been a robbery gone bad. Investigators later found inconsistencies in the son's testimony.

Video evidence showed the attackers lying in wait and using their cellphones as others passed by before attacking Serment, suggesting they were targeting him specifically. Investigators also determined that just a half-hour after the killing, the attackers withdrew money from ATMs and made a purchase at a convenience store using the director's bank cards, indicating that they had access to his PINs.

Serment's wife, Adriana Rosique, told police it was unusual for the son to visit his father and that the girlfriend had been sending cellphone messages while they were at his home.

"There was phone communication between the material authors with the son and his girlfriend," Rios said.

Rosique was found hanged in her home on Sept. 19. The son reportedly told police he had left the home that night to take his girlfriend to a hospital, and didn't learn of his mother's death until the following morning. But there was no record of their presence at the hospital; instead, video recordings showed them walking around streets in the area.

Rios said video cameras also captured the son leaving the home while using his cellphone, and two attackers entering with ease moments later.

"It is the son who leaves the door to the house open," the prosecutor said.

In a search of the home of one of the alleged attackers, investigators found a bank card in Rosique's name that had been used to make daily withdrawals since her death.

In an interview with Mexican journalist Joaquin Lopez-Doriga on Radio Formula, Rios said both victims had life insurance, the son apparently harbored a deep resentment of his parents and they were not accepting of his relationship with the girlfriend. He said that the day before Rosique's death there had been an argument at the home between her, the son and the girlfriend that came to blows.

The Mexican Academy of Cinematographic Arts and Sciences has identified Rosique as a producer. A website for Mexico City-based production company Taller de Luz lists her and Serment as its two contacts.

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Peter Orsi is on Twitter at www.twitter.com/Peter_Orsi

Mexico prosecutors eye son in killing of film director, wife

The murder of film director Leon Serment and his producer wife's subsequent death are believed to have been contract killings arranged by their son for the equivalent of about $5,200 per victim, Mexico City's top prosecutor said Friday.

Prosecutor Rodolfo Rios alleged at a news conference that the unnamed son and his girlfriend were the "intellectual authors" of the murders and said four suspects, including those who ordered and those who carried out the killings, were arrested Thursday.

The alleged plot was said to have been planned over the course of two months.

Serment directed the 2010 film "Tequila Effect," a thriller about the 1994 peso crisis. He was killed by two attackers while returning with his son to his home in the capital the night of Aug. 27, in what was believed at the time to have been a robbery gone bad. Investigators later found inconsistencies in the son's testimony.

Video evidence showed the attackers lying in wait and using their cellphones as others passed by before attacking Serment, suggesting they were targeting him specifically. Investigators also determined that just a half-hour after the killing, the attackers withdrew money from ATMs and made a purchase at a convenience store using the director's bank cards, indicating that they had access to his PINs.

Serment's wife, Adriana Rosique, told police it was unusual for the son to visit his father and that the girlfriend had been sending cellphone messages while they were at his home.

"There was phone communication between the material authors with the son and his girlfriend," Rios said.

Rosique was found hanged in her home on Sept. 19. The son reportedly told police he had left the home that night to take his girlfriend to a hospital, and didn't learn of his mother's death until the following morning. But there was no record of their presence at the hospital; instead, video recordings showed them walking around streets in the area.

Rios said video cameras also captured the son leaving the home while using his cellphone, and two attackers entering with ease moments later.

"It is the son who leaves the door to the house open," the prosecutor said.

In a search of the home of one of the alleged attackers, investigators found a bank card in Rosique's name that had been used to make daily withdrawals since her death.

In an interview with Mexican journalist Joaquin Lopez-Doriga on Radio Formula, Rios said both victims had life insurance, the son apparently harbored a deep resentment of his parents and they were not accepting of his relationship with the girlfriend. He said that the day before Rosique's death there had been an argument at the home between her, the son and the girlfriend that came to blows.

The Mexican Academy of Cinematographic Arts and Sciences has identified Rosique as a producer. A website for Mexico City-based production company Taller de Luz lists her and Serment as its two contacts.

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Peter Orsi is on Twitter at www.twitter.com/Peter_Orsi

Sanders and Giuliani among guests on Sunday's news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

___

NBC's "Meet the Press" — Giuliani; Robby Mook, Clinton campaign manager.

___

CBS' "Face the Nation" — Pre-empted by NFL coverage.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sanders, Giuliani.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.

With grim topicality, 'The13th' opens New York Film Festival

The 54th New York Film Festival kicked off Friday under gray autumn skies, cloaked by an unusual degree of topicality.

Ava DuVernay's documentary on mass incarceration, "The 13th," opened the festival, the first documentary to ever mark the start of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's prestigious celebration. Taking its name from the 13th amendment, DuVernay's film traces the criminalization of African Americans from the abolishment of slavery up to today's overcrowded prisons and Black Lives Matter protests.

It's a portrait of racial dominion through history, by names as varied as Jim Crow and the "war on drugs."

"We can no longer say that prison is a place bad people go because it's much more complicated than that," DuVernay said in an interview ahead of the film's premiere.

"The 13th" will go from Lincoln Center to Netflix, where it will debut next week. As the first movie with a streaming release to play in such a coveted spot at the New York Film Festival, the documentary's selection reflects the changing cinematic landscape.

One of the festival's other much-anticipated world premieres, Ang Lee's "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk," was conceived as an argument for the theatrical experience. Lee's adaption of Ben Fountain's novel about an Iraq war hero on a victory tour in Dallas, was made in 3-D and with a much faster frame-rate than the traditional 24-frames-per-second to boost definition. (Only so many theaters are equipped to screen such a film, so the movie's festival premiere will be held across the street from Lincoln Center, at a multiplex.)

But both films — one made for the immediacy of the small screen, the other a spectacle tailored for the big screen — receive equally significant platforms at the festival.

"I was like: What are you talking about?" says DuVernay of her surprise at being chosen for opening night. "It wasn't made with any intention to be amplified on that scale. I made it to be a resource on Netflix: When you want to know about that thing, this will be here."

But "The 13th" — which DuVernay says was timed purposefully to the election — was immediately hailed Friday by critics as urgent and necessary. The New York Times called it "powerful, infuriating and at times overwhelming."

"Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk" will premiere at the festival Oct. 14 ahead of its November release. But there are many other films in the New York Film Festival's carefully curated slate that make forceful cases for cinema, big and small.

There's Kenneth Lonergan's heart-breaking "Manchester by the Sea," Barry Jenkins' lyrical coming-of-age tale "Moonlight" and Maren Ade's celebrated comedy "Toni Erdmann." Between them, they encompass some of the top breakouts of the film festival circuit, from Sundance, Cannes and Telluride.

But unlike those buzz factories, the New York Film Festival, led by festival director Kent Jones, generally offers a more sober place for assessment and celebration of some of the year's best films from around the world.

Also in the main slate is Gianfranco Rosi's migrant crisis documentary "Fire at Sea," Ken Loach's Palme d'Or-winner "I, Daniel Blake," Jim Jarmusch's "Paterson," starring Adam Driver, and Olivier Assayas' "Personal Shopper," with Kirsten Stewart. The stars of the last two will be individually honored, as well.

Two other world premieres are also on the docket, one which could factor in this fall's Oscar race, another likely to be counted among 2017's best.

Mike Mills ("Beginners") will debut his upcoming "20th Century Woman," a 1970s-set tale about a boy growing up with a single mother in Southern California, starring Annette Bening. And as the festival's closing night film, James Gray will premiere his "The Lost City of Z," an adaption of David Grann's book about the British explorer Percy Fawcett.

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Online: http://www.filmlinc.org/nyff2016/

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Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

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