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Mark Wahlberg's foundation presents youth drug summit

Actor Mark Wahlberg's foundation is hosting a conference this week aimed at keeping teenagers off addictive drugs.

More than 4,500 middle and high school-age students are expected at the Tsongas Arena in Lowell on Tuesday for the Massachusetts Youth Summit on Opioid Awareness. The Mark Wahlberg Youth Foundation is presenting the event.

The conference will address the opioid abuse epidemic by promoting healthy choices and a drug-free lifestyle and educating students about the dangers of drug abuse.

It will feature a showing of the short movie "If Only" and a presentation by former Miami Marlins draft pick Jeff Allison, who will share his story of addiction and recovery.

Other guests include a federal drug enforcement agent, local rappers and former New England Patriots Troy Brown and Matt Light.

'Last Tango in Paris' rape scene revelation sparks outrage

"Last Tango in Paris" is making headlines again 44 years after the controversial film came out. A recently unearthed video interview with Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci from 2013 has renewed interest, and outrage, over what happened to actress Maria Schneider on set during the infamous butter rape scene.

Bertolucci said that neither he nor Marlon Brando told Schneider of their plans to use the stick of butter during the simulated rape scene — a concept they came up with the morning of the shoot — because he wanted her to react "as a girl not as an actress." He wanted her, he said, to feel "the rage and the humiliation."

Schneider, who died in 2011 at age 58 after a lengthy illness, spoke a number of times about the scene between her, then aged 19, and Marlon Brando, then 48, even saying in a 2007 Daily Mail interview that she "felt a little raped" by her co-star and director.

"They only told me about it before we had to film the scene, and I was so angry," Schneider said. "I should have called my agent or had my lawyer come to the set because you can't force someone to do something that isn't in the script. But at the time, I didn't know that."

But despite Schneider's past comments, the video interview with Bertolucci struck a chord this weekend as it circulated on social media that the director was admitting that the scene was non-consensual.

Actress Jessica Chastain wrote on Twitter that she felt "sick" over the revelation that "the director planned her attack."

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay called it "inexcusable."

"As a director, I can barely fathom this. As a woman, I am horrified, disgusted and enraged by it," DuVernay wrote.

Chris Evans also expressed his rage and said it was "beyond disgusting," while Anna Kendrick weighed in that she "used to get eye-rolls" when she brought the incident up to people previously and that she was "glad at least it will be taken seriously now."

Some, like actress Jenna Fischer, took a more extreme stance, writing that "all copies of this film should be destroyed immediately."

Schneider, a relative unknown when she was cast in the film, said that the "whole circus" of suddenly being famous made her turn to drugs and she even attempted suicide a few times. She stayed friends with Brando until his death in 2004, but she said that "for a while we couldn't talk about the movie."

Bertolucci, however, did not maintain a relationship with Schneider. He said he knew she hated him for life in that interview two years after her death. And while he doesn't regret the scene, he said he does feel guilty about it.

'Last Tango in Paris' rape scene revelation sparks outrage

"Last Tango in Paris" is making headlines again 44 years after the controversial film came out. A recently unearthed video interview with Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci from 2013 has renewed interest, and outrage, over what happened to actress Maria Schneider on set during the infamous butter rape scene.

Bertolucci said that neither he nor Marlon Brando told Schneider of their plans to use the stick of butter during the simulated rape scene — a concept they came up with the morning of the shoot — because he wanted her to react "as a girl not as an actress." He wanted her, he said, to feel "the rage and the humiliation."

Schneider, who died in 2011 at age 58 after a lengthy illness, spoke a number of times about the scene between her, then aged 19, and Marlon Brando, then 48, even saying in a 2007 Daily Mail interview that she "felt a little raped" by her co-star and director.

"They only told me about it before we had to film the scene, and I was so angry," Schneider said. "I should have called my agent or had my lawyer come to the set because you can't force someone to do something that isn't in the script. But at the time, I didn't know that."

But despite Schneider's past comments, the video interview with Bertolucci struck a chord this weekend as it circulated on social media that the director was admitting that the scene was non-consensual.

Actress Jessica Chastain wrote on Twitter that she felt "sick" over the revelation that "the director planned her attack."

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay called it "inexcusable."

"As a director, I can barely fathom this. As a woman, I am horrified, disgusted and enraged by it," DuVernay wrote.

Chris Evans also expressed his rage and said it was "beyond disgusting," while Anna Kendrick weighed in that she "used to get eye-rolls" when she brought the incident up to people previously and that she was "glad at least it will be taken seriously now."

Some, like actress Jenna Fischer, took a more extreme stance, writing that "all copies of this film should be destroyed immediately."

Schneider, a relative unknown when she was cast in the film, said that the "whole circus" of suddenly being famous made her turn to drugs and she even attempted suicide a few times. She stayed friends with Brando until his death in 2004, but she said that "for a while we couldn't talk about the movie."

Bertolucci, however, did not maintain a relationship with Schneider. He said he knew she hated him for life in that interview two years after her death. And while he doesn't regret the scene, he said he does feel guilty about it.

Jewish family battles Spain museum over art looted by Nazis

In the epic, 16-year battle over a priceless painting looted by the Nazis, there is one point on which all sides agree: When Lilly Cassirer and her husband fled Germany ahead of the Holocaust, they surrendered their Camille Pissarro masterpiece in exchange for their lives.

The Jewish couple traded the work for the exit visas that allowed them to flee to the safety of England in 1939. When they did so, they set Pissarro's stunning 1897 oil-on-canvas Paris street scene on an incredible journey of its own.

It was an odyssey that would take "Rue St.-Honore, Apres-Midi, Effet de Pluie" from Germany to the United States, through the hands of several wealthy collectors and prominent art dealers and, finally, to Spain's Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, where it has resided since 1993.

Since 2000, Lilly Cassirer's heirs have been trying to get it back.

They may get one of their last best chances Monday when their lawyer, David Boies, argues before a federal appeals court that under state law and international treaties, the painting appraised at more than $30 million belongs to Cassirer's great-grandchildren.

"This is an issue that is critically important not only in terms of trying to right terrible wrongs that had their origin in the Nazi persecution of the Jews but also to establish principles that are very important to what's happening now in the world," Boies said earlier this week.

"Month after month, you see reports of ISIS looting art in Muslim countries and selling it to raise money," he continued. Allowing Spain to keep the painting, he said, would tell the world that buying looted art has no consequences.

The museum's attorney, Thaddeus J. Stauber, argues the issue is no longer about looted art but simply well-documented ownership rights to a painting purchased in good faith.

What's more, Stauber says, Cassirer forfeited her ownership rights when she accepted $13,000 from the German government in 1958 for the painting's loss.

"There's no dispute about the painting's complete history. The court examined all the evidence and determined that the museum is the rightful owner of the painting," Stauber said, referencing a federal judge's ruling in Los Angeles last year.

U.S. District Judge John F. Walter determined that under Spanish law the artwork belongs to the museum, but he concluded that when Cassirer accepted payment for the painting in 1958 she had no idea it still existed.

That shows, Boies says, that Cassirer never signed away her rights.

Her great-grandson, David Cassirer, said his family didn't learn of the work's existence until a friend of his late father, Claude, saw it in a museum catalog in 1999.

"She immediately called my dad because he had told her about the missing painting and had showed her a photo of the missing painting," said Cassirer, who lives in San Diego. "And he was completely stunned because we thought the painting was gone."

Sleuthing by both sides revealed that soon after Lilly Cassirer and her husband left Germany, the work — originally acquired by Lilly's father-in-law from Pissarro's art dealer — was sold to an anonymous German buyer.

It eventually arrived in the United States and was subsequently bought and sold more than once before Baron Hans-Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, scion of Germany's Thyssen steel empire and one of the 20th century's most prominent art collectors, acquired it from New York gallery owner Stephen Hahn in 1976.

Thyssen-Bornemisza, who died in 2002, gave the painting and the rest of his collection to the Spanish government in 1993, creating the museum that bears his name.

After the museum refused to hand over the work, the Cassirer family sued.

At one point, a judge dismissed the lawsuit, saying California law extending the statute of limitations for art theft to 100 years infringed on the federal government's authority. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the case reheard, leading to Walter's ruling last year in favor of the museum. The appeals court now takes up the issue again at Monday's hearing before a three-judge panel in Pasadena.

Boies argues the judge misinterpreted Spanish law in issuing last year's ruling and that, in any case, Spain is a signatory to international treaties that seek to return looted art to its rightful owners.

He pointed out that just last Monday, France returned a 16th century portrait attributed to Joos van Cleve or his son to the descendants of another German-Jewish couple forced to sell when they fled Germany. He said Spain should follow France's lead.

"The message that the Spanish museum's argument sends to the people who would loot art today is a terrible message and one that is really shameful," he said.

Jewish family battles Spain museum over art looted by Nazis

In the epic, 16-year battle over a priceless painting looted by the Nazis, there is one point on which all sides agree: When Lilly Cassirer and her husband fled Germany ahead of the Holocaust, they surrendered their Camille Pissarro masterpiece in exchange for their lives.

The Jewish couple traded the work for the exit visas that allowed them to flee to the safety of England in 1939. When they did so, they set Pissarro's stunning 1897 oil-on-canvas Paris street scene on an incredible journey of its own.

It was an odyssey that would take "Rue St.-Honore, Apres-Midi, Effet de Pluie" from Germany to the United States, through the hands of several wealthy collectors and prominent art dealers and, finally, to Spain's Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, where it has resided since 1993.

Since 2000, Lilly Cassirer's heirs have been trying to get it back.

They may get one of their last best chances Monday when their lawyer, David Boies, argues before a federal appeals court that under state law and international treaties, the painting appraised at more than $30 million belongs to Cassirer's great-grandchildren.

"This is an issue that is critically important not only in terms of trying to right terrible wrongs that had their origin in the Nazi persecution of the Jews but also to establish principles that are very important to what's happening now in the world," Boies said earlier this week.

"Month after month, you see reports of ISIS looting art in Muslim countries and selling it to raise money," he continued. Allowing Spain to keep the painting, he said, would tell the world that buying looted art has no consequences.

The museum's attorney, Thaddeus J. Stauber, argues the issue is no longer about looted art but simply well-documented ownership rights to a painting purchased in good faith.

What's more, Stauber says, Cassirer forfeited her ownership rights when she accepted $13,000 from the German government in 1958 for the painting's loss.

"There's no dispute about the painting's complete history. The court examined all the evidence and determined that the museum is the rightful owner of the painting," Stauber said, referencing a federal judge's ruling in Los Angeles last year.

U.S. District Judge John F. Walter determined that under Spanish law the artwork belongs to the museum, but he concluded that when Cassirer accepted payment for the painting in 1958 she had no idea it still existed.

That shows, Boies says, that Cassirer never signed away her rights.

Her great-grandson, David Cassirer, said his family didn't learn of the work's existence until a friend of his late father, Claude, saw it in a museum catalog in 1999.

"She immediately called my dad because he had told her about the missing painting and had showed her a photo of the missing painting," said Cassirer, who lives in San Diego. "And he was completely stunned because we thought the painting was gone."

Sleuthing by both sides revealed that soon after Lilly Cassirer and her husband left Germany, the work — originally acquired by Lilly's father-in-law from Pissarro's art dealer — was sold to an anonymous German buyer.

It eventually arrived in the United States and was subsequently bought and sold more than once before Baron Hans-Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, scion of Germany's Thyssen steel empire and one of the 20th century's most prominent art collectors, acquired it from New York gallery owner Stephen Hahn in 1976.

Thyssen-Bornemisza, who died in 2002, gave the painting and the rest of his collection to the Spanish government in 1993, creating the museum that bears his name.

After the museum refused to hand over the work, the Cassirer family sued.

At one point, a judge dismissed the lawsuit, saying California law extending the statute of limitations for art theft to 100 years infringed on the federal government's authority. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the case reheard, leading to Walter's ruling last year in favor of the museum. The appeals court now takes up the issue again at Monday's hearing before a three-judge panel in Pasadena.

Boies argues the judge misinterpreted Spanish law in issuing last year's ruling and that, in any case, Spain is a signatory to international treaties that seek to return looted art to its rightful owners.

He pointed out that just last Monday, France returned a 16th century portrait attributed to Joos van Cleve or his son to the descendants of another German-Jewish couple forced to sell when they fled Germany. He said Spain should follow France's lead.

"The message that the Spanish museum's argument sends to the people who would loot art today is a terrible message and one that is really shameful," he said.

Leftovers 'Moana,' 'Fantastic Beasts' rule box office again

Audiences came back for a second helping of "Moana" and "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" this weekend. Both family-friendly films topped the post-Thanksgiving box office charts, with "Moana" bringing in $28.4 million and "Fantastic Beasts" earning $18.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Disney's animated "Moana," in only its second weekend in theaters and second weekend at No. 1, has grossed $119.9 million, while Warner Bros.' Harry Potter spinoff "Fantastic Beasts" has earned $183.5 million in three weeks.

Paramount's sci-fi mindbender "Arrival" took third with $7.3 million, while the company's World War II spy thriller "Allied" placed fourth with $7.1 million. Disney and Marvel's "Doctor Strange" rounded out the top five with $6.5 million, bringing its domestic total to $215.3 million.

The weekend's only new opener, the micro-budget horror film "Incarnate," fell short of modest expectations and took in only $2.6 million. The film, which stars Carice van Houten and Aaron Eckhart, was expected to earn in the $4 million range.

"We are disappointed that we fell short of our goal and repeating the success of our previous releases," BH Tilt executive John Hegeman said. "The low-cost nature of the BH Tilt films and release model enables us to experiment and take risks, and we look forward to seeing what we can learn from this weekend for our future BH Tilt slate releases in 2017."

In limited release, the Jacqueline Kennedy biopic "Jackie," starring Natalie Portman in one of the year's buzziest performances, earned $275,000 from five theaters. Another awards contender, "Manchester by the Sea" expanded to 156 theaters and brought in $2.4 million.

Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst for box office tracker comScore, said that this post-Thanksgiving weekend is usually pretty slow.

"The Thanksgiving holiday is a long, extended binge of eating food and watching lots of movies, and then this weekend is the diet. It is somewhat typical," Dergarabedian said. "It's like we're taking a quick breather before the homestretch."

The weekend overall is expected to be down about 3 percent from last year, which saw the Christmas-themed horror film "Krampus" rake in $16.3 million. But the box office for the year remains up around 4 percent.

The question now is whether or not the 2016 box office will surpass last year's record $11.135 billion. While there are still some big films on the horizon, including "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" and the animated "Sing," it remains to be seen whether or not they will compete with the late-game 2015 juggernaut of "The Force Awakens," which earned $652 million in the last 14 days of the year.

"It's going to be a tight race," Dergarabedian said.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1."Moana," $28.4 million ($32 million international).

2."Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," $18.5 million ($60.4 million international).

3."Arrival," $7.3 million ($4.8 million international0

4."Allied," $7.1 million ($12.1 million international).

5."Doctor Strange," $6.5 million ($3.7 million international).

6."Trolls," $4.6 million ($7.1 million international).

7."Hacksaw Ridge," $3.4 million ($1.8 million international).

8."Bad Santa 2," $3.3 million ($1 million international).

9."Incarnate," $2.6 million ($370,000 international).

10."Almost Christmas," $2.5 million.

___

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore:

1. "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," $60.4 million.

2. "Your Name," $40.9 million.

3. "Moana," $32 million.

4. "Underworld: Blood Wars," $16.3 million.

5. "Allied," $12.1 million.

6. "Sully," $11.2 million.

7. "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children," $10.5 million.

8. "Sword Master," $7.3 million.

9. "Jack Reacher: Never Go Back," $5.9 million.

10. "Arrival," $4.8 million.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr

Leftovers 'Moana,' 'Fantastic Beasts' rule box office again

Audiences came back for a second helping of "Moana" and "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" this weekend. Both family-friendly films topped the post-Thanksgiving box office charts, with "Moana" bringing in $28.4 million and "Fantastic Beasts" earning $18.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Disney's animated "Moana," in only its second weekend in theaters and second weekend at No. 1, has grossed $119.9 million, while Warner Bros.' Harry Potter spinoff "Fantastic Beasts" has earned $183.5 million in three weeks.

Paramount's sci-fi mindbender "Arrival" took third with $7.3 million, while the company's World War II spy thriller "Allied" placed fourth with $7.1 million. Disney and Marvel's "Doctor Strange" rounded out the top five with $6.5 million, bringing its domestic total to $215.3 million.

The weekend's only new opener, the micro-budget horror film "Incarnate," fell short of modest expectations and took in only $2.6 million. The film, which stars Carice van Houten and Aaron Eckhart, was expected to earn in the $4 million range.

"We are disappointed that we fell short of our goal and repeating the success of our previous releases," BH Tilt executive John Hegeman said. "The low-cost nature of the BH Tilt films and release model enables us to experiment and take risks, and we look forward to seeing what we can learn from this weekend for our future BH Tilt slate releases in 2017."

In limited release, the Jacqueline Kennedy biopic "Jackie," starring Natalie Portman in one of the year's buzziest performances, earned $275,000 from five theaters. Another awards contender, "Manchester by the Sea" expanded to 156 theaters and brought in $2.4 million.

Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst for box office tracker comScore, said that this post-Thanksgiving weekend is usually pretty slow.

"The Thanksgiving holiday is a long, extended binge of eating food and watching lots of movies, and then this weekend is the diet. It is somewhat typical," Dergarabedian said. "It's like we're taking a quick breather before the homestretch."

The weekend overall is expected to be down about 3 percent from last year, which saw the Christmas-themed horror film "Krampus" rake in $16.3 million. But the box office for the year remains up around 4 percent.

The question now is whether or not the 2016 box office will surpass last year's record $11.135 billion. While there are still some big films on the horizon, including "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" and the animated "Sing," it remains to be seen whether or not they will compete with the late-game 2015 juggernaut of "The Force Awakens," which earned $652 million in the last 14 days of the year.

"It's going to be a tight race," Dergarabedian said.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1."Moana," $28.4 million ($32 million international).

2."Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," $18.5 million ($60.4 million international).

3."Arrival," $7.3 million ($4.8 million international0

4."Allied," $7.1 million ($12.1 million international).

5."Doctor Strange," $6.5 million ($3.7 million international).

6."Trolls," $4.6 million ($7.1 million international).

7."Hacksaw Ridge," $3.4 million ($1.8 million international).

8."Bad Santa 2," $3.3 million ($1 million international).

9."Incarnate," $2.6 million ($370,000 international).

10."Almost Christmas," $2.5 million.

___

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore:

1. "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," $60.4 million.

2. "Your Name," $40.9 million.

3. "Moana," $32 million.

4. "Underworld: Blood Wars," $16.3 million.

5. "Allied," $12.1 million.

6. "Sully," $11.2 million.

7. "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children," $10.5 million.

8. "Sword Master," $7.3 million.

9. "Jack Reacher: Never Go Back," $5.9 million.

10. "Arrival," $4.8 million.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr

SNL Presents the Haunting “Hunt For Hill”

Extensive searching in the style of those cheesy murder mystery murder shows unveils a series of scene you just can’t stop watching (just like those cheesy murder mystery shows!)

SNL Presents the Haunting “Hunt For Hill”

Extensive searching in the style of those cheesy murder mystery murder shows unveils a series of scene you just can’t stop watching (just like those cheesy murder mystery shows!)

Obama to join Kennedy Center Honors gala for last time

This year's Kennedy Center Honors gala will be bittersweet for some because it's the last one under President Barack Obama, but the festivities aren't likely to be much different next year under President-elect Donald Trump, the Kennedy Center president said.

Actor Al Pacino, rock band the Eagles, pianist Martha Argerich, gospel singer Mavis Staples and singer-songwriter James Taylor will receive the honors on Sunday. The annual awards go to performers who influence American culture through the arts.

Kennedy Center president Deborah Rutter told The Associated Press that Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry, who handed out medals to the performers on Saturday night, have enthusiastically welcomed the honorees every year, and the honorees have been eager to spend time with them. Kerry in particular went out of his way this year, flying from Rome to Washington on Saturday attend the honors dinner before a scheduled trip to Berlin on Sunday.

Obama "has a very personal relationship with quite a number of artists," Rutter said. "There is a sense from many of the artists that they are fond of him and respect him and appreciate him. I think there's some bittersweet (feelings)."

The Kennedy Center Honors are in their 39th year, a period that has included six presidents — three Republicans, three Democrats — and all have taken time to welcome the recipients. But the 2016 election was noteworthy for the way A-list performers lined up behind Obama and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, while Trump had relatively few celebrity endorsements.

"We can't really anticipate or speculate how things are going to work" under Trump, Rutter said. "Each president has their own style and their own connection to the arts, but each of them have participated and been enthusiastic."

Rutter, who has led the Kennedy Center for the past two years, said she's not aware of any performer turning down the honor for political reasons, and she doesn't expect that to happen in the future.

"Let's remember that this is the Kennedy Center Honors and that we are the nation's cultural center," she said. "It's not technically the president that's bestowing the honor. It's the Kennedy Center. I anticipate that we will have a wonderful selection of honorees next year."

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