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'Breaking Bad' star Aaron Paul posts tribute to Pearl Jam

Paul posted a picture of himself with Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder on his Instagram account Thursday.

In the caption, he relates a story of buying the band's debut album, "Ten," on the day it came out in 1991, which also happened to be his 12th birthday. He said he returned home to find his family's house empty and was playing the album when his mother called to tell him they were at the hospital, where his sister had given birth.

He says "so many emotions" went through him that day and Vedder "was a huge part of that."

The band has marked the 25th anniversary of the album's release on tour this year.

'Breaking Bad' star Aaron Paul posts tribute to Pearl Jam

Paul posted a picture of himself with Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder on his Instagram account Thursday.

In the caption, he relates a story of buying the band's debut album, "Ten," on the day it came out in 1991, which also happened to be his 12th birthday. He said he returned home to find his family's house empty and was playing the album when his mother called to tell him they were at the hospital, where his sister had given birth.

He says "so many emotions" went through him that day and Vedder "was a huge part of that."

The band has marked the 25th anniversary of the album's release on tour this year.

Pittsburgh symphony musicians reject pay cuts, go on strike

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians went on strike Friday after unanimously rejecting calls for a 15 percent pay cut, but management contends those cuts and others are necessary because the orchestra is more than $20 million in debt.

"Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians are exceptional artists and deserve every dollar and every benefit we can afford to offer," said Melia Tourangeau, who took over as symphony president and CEO last year. "At the same time, we must squarely confront the very real financial crisis that we are facing."

Tourangeau said management's demands are part of a "five-year growth model to sustainability." But the need for immediate cuts is necessary because of a recent financial assessment that showed the orchestra "would run out of cash and have to close the doors in May/June 2017," board chair Devin McGranahan said.

Symphony managers say the orchestra is running a $1.5 million annual deficit and faces more than $20 million in cumulative debt over the next five years.

They say the pension fund needs at least $10 million over the next five years to remain solvent. That's one reason they say they wants to freeze pensions for any musician with less than 30 years' experience, and move them into a 401(k) plan — another move that prompted the strike.

The musicians have agreed to concessions in the past, most recently a nearly 10 percent pay cut in 2011 to help the orchestra deal with funding issues. The proposed immediate 15 percent pay cut would reduce each musician's base pay from $107,239 to $91,153, the union said, with annual raises of 2 percent and 3 percent in each of the next two years.

"The consequences of those cuts would be severe and immediate," the union said in a statement announcing the strike. It predicted musicians would leave, and the symphony would be unable to attract top-notch players.

However, management contends several musicians earn more than double the base pay for certain position. Musicians also get up to 10 weeks' vacation and 12 weeks of sick time each year, plus overtime and seniority pay, management said.

The last three-year contract expired Sept. 5. Contract talks had continued with a federal mediator, but the union contends management wouldn't budge from its last offer, which was rejected Thursday. The musicians have offered unspecified "major" concessions on "salary, pension and size of the orchestra — all the topics that are the focus of management's demands," the union said.

The union contends management also wants the right to unilaterally cut orchestra staff, currently 99 musicians and two librarians, by an unspecified number. Management said only that it wants to leave three vacant positions unfilled, but didn't otherwise address staffing numbers.

The union contends ticket sales are up and that donations to the orchestra's annual fund broke a record. Management doesn't dispute that but said the other changes still are necessary.

___

This story has been corrected to show the symphony president's first name is Melia, not Malia.

Pittsburgh symphony musicians reject pay cuts, go on strike

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians went on strike Friday after unanimously rejecting calls for a 15 percent pay cut, but management contends those cuts and others are necessary because the orchestra is more than $20 million in debt.

"Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians are exceptional artists and deserve every dollar and every benefit we can afford to offer," said Melia Tourangeau, who took over as symphony president and CEO last year. "At the same time, we must squarely confront the very real financial crisis that we are facing."

Tourangeau said management's demands are part of a "five-year growth model to sustainability." But the need for immediate cuts is necessary because of a recent financial assessment that showed the orchestra "would run out of cash and have to close the doors in May/June 2017," board chair Devin McGranahan said.

Symphony managers say the orchestra is running a $1.5 million annual deficit and faces more than $20 million in cumulative debt over the next five years.

They say the pension fund needs at least $10 million over the next five years to remain solvent. That's one reason they say they wants to freeze pensions for any musician with less than 30 years' experience, and move them into a 401(k) plan — another move that prompted the strike.

The musicians have agreed to concessions in the past, most recently a nearly 10 percent pay cut in 2011 to help the orchestra deal with funding issues. The proposed immediate 15 percent pay cut would reduce each musician's base pay from $107,239 to $91,153, the union said, with annual raises of 2 percent and 3 percent in each of the next two years.

"The consequences of those cuts would be severe and immediate," the union said in a statement announcing the strike. It predicted musicians would leave, and the symphony would be unable to attract top-notch players.

However, management contends several musicians earn more than double the base pay for certain position. Musicians also get up to 10 weeks' vacation and 12 weeks of sick time each year, plus overtime and seniority pay, management said.

The last three-year contract expired Sept. 5. Contract talks had continued with a federal mediator, but the union contends management wouldn't budge from its last offer, which was rejected Thursday. The musicians have offered unspecified "major" concessions on "salary, pension and size of the orchestra — all the topics that are the focus of management's demands," the union said.

The union contends management also wants the right to unilaterally cut orchestra staff, currently 99 musicians and two librarians, by an unspecified number. Management said only that it wants to leave three vacant positions unfilled, but didn't otherwise address staffing numbers.

The union contends ticket sales are up and that donations to the orchestra's annual fund broke a record. Management doesn't dispute that but said the other changes still are necessary.

___

This story has been corrected to show the symphony president's first name is Melia, not Malia.

Who is Kiiara With That Song Called “Gold “?

Know that song with the weird female singing that jumps around called “Gold”? That’s Kiiara. Her real name is Kiara Saulters and she’s from Wilmington Illinois (about an hour from Chicago). She wrote the song  while she was still working at a hardware store, maybe when she was showing folks where the toilet plungers were? Anyway, here’s the video for this really cool song called “Gold”!

 

 

 

Who is Kiiara and a song called “Gold “

Know that song with the weird female singing that jumps around called “Gold”? That’s Kiiara. Her real name is Kiara Saulters and she’s from Wilmington Illinois (about an hour from Chicago). She wrote the song  while she was still working at a hardware store, maybe when she was showing folks where the toilet plungers were? Anyway, here’s the video for this really cool song called “Gold”!

 

 

 

Who is Kiiara With That Song Called “Gold “?

Know that song with the weird female singing that jumps around called “Gold”? That’s Kiiara. Her real name is Kiara Saulters and she’s from Wilmington Illinois (about an hour from Chicago). She wrote the song  while she was still working at a hardware store, maybe when she was showing folks where the toilet plungers were? Anyway, here’s the video for this really cool song called “Gold”!

 

 

 

Judge: Bieber must sit for deposition or face arrest, court

A Florida judge has ordered pop star Justin Bieber to sit down for a deposition within the next 30 days or face the threat of being arrested and brought to court.

Circuit Judge Jerald Bagley issued the order Wednesday in Miami.

The order compels Bieber to sit for a deposition in a lawsuit filed by a photographer who got into an altercation with one of the singer's bodyguards two years ago in Miami Beach.

The photographer's attorney says he has been unable to get Bieber to sit for the deposition. Attorney Mark DiCowden says Bieber isn't entitled to any special treatment just because he's a celebrity.

Bieber's attorney, John Atkinson, didn't immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

Short on donations, Romania faces deadline to buy Brancusi

Romania's culture minister says the public has donated much less than needed to buy a nationally treasured work by sculptor Constantin Brancusi.

Corina Suteu thanked the 100,000 contributors who had given 1.163 million euros ($1.30 million) as of Friday, adding the government has one month left to buy the sculpture, "Wisdom of the Earth," from its private owners.

Romania's government plans to pay 5 million euros toward the sculpture's 11-million-euro purchase price. The government launched a public campaign in March to raise the remaining 6 million euros.

Suteu says she will present a new plan soon to fill the deficit.

"Wisdom of the Earth" depicts a female figure sitting with folded arms and her legs pulled up. It is one of just a few Brancusi works remaining in his homeland.

Short on donations, Romania faces deadline to buy Brancusi

Romania's culture minister says the public has donated much less than needed to buy a nationally treasured work by sculptor Constantin Brancusi.

Corina Suteu thanked the 100,000 contributors who had given 1.163 million euros ($1.30 million) as of Friday, adding the government has one month left to buy the sculpture, "Wisdom of the Earth," from its private owners.

Romania's government plans to pay 5 million euros toward the sculpture's 11-million-euro purchase price. The government launched a public campaign in March to raise the remaining 6 million euros.

Suteu says she will present a new plan soon to fill the deficit.

"Wisdom of the Earth" depicts a female figure sitting with folded arms and her legs pulled up. It is one of just a few Brancusi works remaining in his homeland.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >