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Miley Cyrus takes to Instagram to clarify hip-hop remarks

The pop star took to Instagram over the weekend to clarify remarks in a recent interview that some have seen as denigrating hip-hop music and rap lyrics.

"So, to be clear I respect ALL artists who speak their truth and appreciate ALL genres of music," Cyrus wrote Friday. "I have always and will continue to love and celebrate hip hop as I've collaborated with some of the very best!"

But, she added, "At this point in my life I am expanding personally/musically and gravitating more towards uplifting, conscious rap!"

In a Billboard magazine interview published online Wednesday, Cyrus gave a generic example of sexually explicit lyrics about women, and said that such lyrics "pushed me out of the hip-hop scene a little."

On Instagram, Cyrus added that as she gets older, she understands the effect music has on the world.

"I feel the younger generation needs to hear positive powerful lyrics!" she wrote.

Cyrus also told Billboard that she hadn't smoked marijuana in three weeks — the longest she's ever gone without it. The 24-year-old former Disney star also said she had been surprised by the reaction to her much-discussed twerking performance at the MTV Music Video Awards in 2013, alongside Robin Thicke.

Cyrus is promoting an upcoming album. Its lead single, "Malibu," is set to be released Thursday. She said her new music is unlike anything she has recorded before.

Loretta Lynn remains hospitalized in Nashville after stroke

Country music legend Loretta Lynn remains hospitalized after having a stroke, a publicist said Saturday.

Sony Music publicist Maria Malta said nothing has changed from information posted on Lynn's website.

The website says the 85-year-old singer and songwriter was admitted to a Nashville hospital Thursday night after suffering the stroke at her home in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee. Malta confirmed that Lynn is still in the hospital.

Lynn's website says she is responsive and expected to make a full recovery.

It says Lynn has been advised by doctors to stay off the road while she recuperates, and upcoming scheduled shows will be postponed.

Lynn's sister, the Grammy-winning singer Crystal Gayle, said in a statement emailed by her publicist, "Many of you have heard that my sister, Loretta Lynn, had a stroke. She's a strong woman and I know she'll come out of this. Our family appreciates your prayers, love and support. We pray for a speedy recovery."

Born a Kentucky coal miner's daughter, Lynn had a string of hits starting in the 1960s with the biographical "Coal Miner's Daughter," ''You Ain't Woman Enough," ''The Pill," and "One's on the Way." Her songs reflect pride in her humble background and speak frankly of her experiences as a young wife and mother from poor Appalachia.

Her 1977 autobiography was made into a popular movie that brought an Oscar for Sissy Spacek's portrayal of the singer. More recently, Lynn won two Grammy Awards in 2005 for her album "Van Lear Rose."

She continues to tour and record regularly, but had to postpone shows last year after suffering injuries in a fall that required surgery. She is set to release a new album this August, called "Wouldn't It Be Great," and she will be the subject of a new exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum also in August.

One of the icons of country music, Lynn blazed a trail as a strong-willed singer and songwriter who wrote honest, and at times frank, songs about sex, divorce, cheating and even birth control.

She had six children with her husband of 48 years, O.V. "Mooney" Lynn, who died in 1996.

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This story has been corrected to show that O.V. Lynn's nickname was spelled Mooney, not Moonie.

Thomas preps for another Jazz Fest

New Orleans soul queen Irma Thomas hasn't missed a performance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival since 1974.

And she's scheduled for another one on Saturday, paving the way for Stevie Wonder's return to the festival after rain canceled his set last year.

Thomas is scheduled to appear on the festival's largest stage at 3:05 p.m. CDT. Wonder takes the same stage at 4:50 p.m. CDT., to close out the day.

"I'm honored at my age, 76, to still be called upon to perform," Thomas told The Associated Press. "I do it with great joy."

Thomas said she enjoys the crowd so much because most are fans who have followed her career since she began singing in the 1950s.

"I'm not singing to total strangers. I used to teach them all the latest dances and a lot of those people are still fans today. Some have become friends, who've brainwashed their kids into listening to my music. It's become a generational thing. They're bringing their kids and their grandkids and their great-grandkids. It's a wonderful way of being accepted."

She said her performances rarely include a set song list.

"If they ask me to sing their favorite song and I wasn't planning to, I will sing it," Thomas said. "That's why people come to the festival. They want to hear the songs that make them feel closest to that entertainer. That's the relationship I have with my audience and I don't want them to leave disappointed."

The Grammy-winning singer is known for such hits as "Time Is On My Side," ''Ruler of My Heart," and "It's Raining."

For the last 4 decades, Irma Thomas has wowed Jazz Fest

New Orleans' soul queen, Irma Thomas, hasn't missed a performance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival since 1974.

And she's scheduled for another one on Saturday, paving the way for Stevie Wonder's return to the festival after rain canceled his set last year.

Thomas is scheduled to appear on the festival's largest stage at 3:05 p.m.; Wonder takes the same stage at 4:50 p.m. to close out the day.

"I'm honored at my age, 76, to still be called upon to perform," Thomas told The Associated Press. "I do it with great joy."

Thomas said she enjoys the crowd so much because most are fans who have followed her career since she began singing in the 1950s.

"I'm not singing to total strangers. I used to teach them all the latest dances and a lot of those people are still fans today. Some have become friends, who've brainwashed their kids into listening to my music. It's become a generational thing. They're bringing their kids and their grandkids and their great-grandkids. It's a wonderful way of being accepted."

She said her performances rarely include a set song list.

"If they ask me to sing their favorite song and I wasn't planning to, I will sing it," Thomas said. "That's why people come to the festival. They want to hear the songs that makes them feel closest to that entertainer. That's the relationship I have with my audience and I don't want them to leave disappointed."

The Grammy-winning singer is known for such hits as "Time Is On My Side," ''Ruler of My Heart," and "It's Raining."

The whole gumbo: Notes from lovers of New Orleans' Jazz Fest

For seven days, the blare of trombones, tubas, washboards, guitars and soul-stirring vocals washes over this city as artists perform at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Jazz Fest features an assortment of well-known out-of-town artists such as Stevie Wonder and Maroon 5 as well as the zydeco, jazz and blues music Louisiana is known for. This year The Associated Press talked with festival-goers, musicians and vendors to find out why they come to the festival and what it means to them. Here are their stories:

THE 'HOW YA GONNA CLAP?' GUY

Ray Hackett is the "How ya gonna clap?" man. His beverage holders on a strap enable festival-goers to keep their beers or other beverages cold while clapping to the music at the same time. He's a New Orleans native who now lives in Buffalo, Missouri, and has been selling his items at Jazz Fest since 1983. Why? "Income. Income opportunity. And I've done it so long that people come by and say. 'It wouldn't be Jazz Fest without you.' So it's fun. I see a lot of people that I've seen for a long time. Everybody is in a good mood and relaxed."

Hackett grew up in New Orleans, came up with his product and once his business took off, he was able to move.

"I have a farm up there (Missouri) and manufacture these in my barn. ... It's too much fun to quit."

GUITAR MAKERS

Gilberto Mendez Lainati and his father, Gilberto Mendez Mendez of Santiago de Cuba, the island's second-largest city, brought their hand-made guitars, ukuleles and laúds to the tent at Jazz Fest where Cuban arts, crafts and music are on display. Apologizing for his English skills, the younger man explained why he came: "We're here for demonstration of our job for United States people. We are musicians, but apart from that, we make instruments. My father has his group and I have my group in Cuba. Sometimes we play outside our country."

"It's our opportunity for present our job to United States -- mix together with people who come here and ask about our job. Interesting exchange of cultures," he said.

THE MUSICIANS

Drummer Jayme Romain, of Lake Charles, tried to explain his love of Jazz Fest while he walked around the festival grounds ahead of the set he'd be playing with his friend, guitarist Randy Ellis, of Thibodaux, and the Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band: "Everything. It's the whole gumbo and I love gumbo baby. Yes, ma'am. That's what it means to me. Love. Freedom. Peace. Music."

Ellis, for his part, says they play the festival "pretty much every year ... I remember when it was cheaper to buy a ticket and get in here than it is to park now. That was a long time ago!"

"It's the biggest festival in the country, music festival-wise. I don't think there's anything — and I've been touring for almost 30 years — and there's not much comes close to Jazz Fest," he said.

JAZZ FEST NEWBIES

Many New Orleans residents grow up coming to Jazz Fest every year. Not Lakeisha Jolivett and Francesca Bermudez. Bermudez came for the first time last year and enjoyed it so much she brought Jolivett. The big draw for these two was Nas, the New York rap artist: "I came for her birthday (pointing to Jolivett) and I came to see Nas," Bermudez said.

"Last time when I came to see Red Hot Chili Peppers I really liked the atmosphere, the food, just everything, how the culture gets together. ... We all get to be here in this melting pot and just enjoy music and music transcends all cultures, religion, race, and I think that this is something special, where you can actually forget what is going on and actually embrace each other and enjoy the atmosphere."

SO MANY CALORIES

For many festival-goers, the food is just as important as the music and for them, Crawfish Monica, is often the star. Chef Pierre Hilzim and his team of workers cook up the delicious food each year: "For food, this is fun to do," he said.

"It's been a great time. My children have grown up here, literally. They were not even a year old when they first started coming to Jazz Fest, and now they're here pretty much running the food, with me getting in their way," he said.

He said Jazz Fest really launched the dish: "It's allowed us to meet people we never would have met. We've fed three presidents, two popes, a whole bunch of heads of state, all kinds of celebrities and people, and they wander back here. I mean, we fed Francis Ford Coppola here one day."

Country legend Loretta Lynn hospitalized after having stroke

Country music legend Loretta Lynn has been hospitalized after having a stroke, her publicist said Friday.

Maria Malta, a publicist for Sony Music, confirmed that the 85-year-old singer and songwriter was admitted into a Nashville hospital Thursday night after suffering the stroke at her home in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee.

Lynn's website says she is responsive and expected to make a full recovery.

It says Lynn has been advised by doctors to stay off the road while she recuperates, and upcoming scheduled shows will be postponed.

Lynn's sister, the Grammy-winning singer Crystal Gayle, said in a statement emailed by her publicist, "Many of you have heard that my sister, Loretta Lynn, had a stroke. She's a strong woman and I know she'll come out of this. Our family appreciates your prayers, love and support. We pray for a speedy recovery."

Born a Kentucky coal miner's daughter, Lynn had a string of hits starting in the 1960s with the biographical "Coal Miner's Daughter," ''You Ain't Woman Enough," ''The Pill," and "One's on the Way." Her songs reflect pride in her humble background and speak frankly of her experiences as a young wife and mother from poor Appalachia.

Her 1977 autobiography was made into a popular movie that brought an Oscar for Sissy Spacek's portrayal of the singer. More recently, Lynn won two Grammy Awards in 2005 for her album "Van Lear Rose."

She continues to tour and record regularly, but had to postpone shows last year after suffering injuries in a fall that required surgery. She is set to release a new album this August, called "Wouldn't It Be Great," and she will be the subject of a new exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum also in August.

One of the icons of country music, Lynn blazed a trail as a strong-willed singer and songwriter who wrote honest, and at times frank, songs about sex, divorce, cheating and even birth control.

She had six children with her husband of 48 years, O.V. "Moonie" Lynn, who died in 1996

Country music legend's website: Loretta Lynn hospitalized after having a stroke, expected to recover

Country music legend's website: Loretta Lynn hospitalized after having a stroke, expected to recover.

Dolly Parton distributes last checks to wildfire victims

Dolly Parton's Dollywood Foundation has given $10,000 each to nearly 900 families displaced by deadly wildfires in Tennessee last year.

The singer said in a statement that the final distribution of checks was made this week to families in Sevier County to help them rebuild. The Country Music Hall of Fame singer started the My People fund after wildfires struck in November, killing 14 people in the Gatlinburg area and destroying or damaging thousands of buildings.

Parton held a star-studded telethon to bring in hundreds of thousands of donations to the fund. But the singer isn't stopping her charity. She said $3 million will be used to start a new fund called Mountain Tough Recovery, which will continue to aid residents affected by the fires.

The top 10 songs and albums on the iTunes Store

Top Songs

1.I'm the One (feat. Justin Bieb., DJ Khaled

2.Despacito (feat. Justin Bieber), Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee

3.HUMBLE., Kendrick Lamar

4.(tie) Something Just Like This, The Chainsmokers & Coldplay

4.(tie) That's What I Like, Bruno Mars

6.Believer, Imagine Dragons

7.Body Like a Back Road, Sam Hunt

8. Issues, Julia Michaels

9.It Ain't Me, Kygo & Selena Gomez

10.Shape of You, Ed Sheeran

Top Albums

1.DAMN., Kendrick Lamar

2.Humanz, Gorillaz

3.Strength of a Woman, Mary J. Blige

4.Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. ., Various Artists

5.÷, Ed Sheeran

6.SHINE, Wale

7.Moana, Various Artists

8.God's Problem Child, Willie Nelson

9.Places, Lea Michele

10.24K Magic, Bruno Mars

__________

(copyright) 2017 Apple Inc.

Club owner who turned Sunset Strip into rock heaven dies

Mario Maglieri, the Hollywood entrepreneur who doubled as a godfather figure to generations of rock stars from the Doors' Jim Morrison to Guns 'N Roses' Axl Rose, has died at age 93.

Maglieri died Thursday morning "surrounded by loved ones," his family said in a statement. No cause of death was given.

For decades he operated two of Hollywood's most venerable and legendary Sunset Strip nightclubs — the Whiskey A Go Go and the Rainbow Bar & Grill.

"Rest In Peace Mario Maglieri King of The Sunset Strip," the marquee over the Whiskey proclaimed Friday.

It was at the Whiskey that the Doors found a following as the house band in the 1960s. Over the years Led Zeppelin, the Police, Van Halen and literally hundreds of other acts spanning generations have played there.

The Beatles dropped by for a visit during their first U.S. tour in 1964. George Harrison, annoyed by a paparazzi, threw a drink at him, hitting actress Mamie Van Doren instead.

At the Rainbow, Maglieri would keep many of his musicians in booze and food, occasionally having to throw one or more of them out when they caused too much trouble.

"The rowdiest? Oh, Guns N' Roses! I had to put them out I don't know how many times," he told the Los Angeles Times in 1993. "They're good guys, but they get out of hand."

Born Feb. 7, 1924, in Seppino, Italy, Mario Mikeal Maglieri moved to the United States with his family at age 4.

He ran restaurants and clubs in Chicago for a few years before moving to Los Angeles in the 1960s to manage the Whiskey, eventually taking it over. A few years later, he and partners took over a nearby Sunset Strip restaurant and renamed it the Rainbow.

It was a heady time on the Strip in those early years, one punctuated by up-and-coming young musicians and their groupies, many living in nearby Laurel Canyon. There was an abundance of drugs and alcohol as well, although Maglieri said he never partook of the former.

"I'm 70 years old, and I've never smoked a joint in my life," he told the Times in 1993. "People ask me and I tell them, 'Dope is for dopes.' People want to fight me on that, I'll fight them. I've seen too many lives destroyed by drugs."

He said he bought Janis Joplin a bottle of her favorite whiskey, Southern Comfort, three days before she died of a drug overdose in 1970. He also spent a good deal of time trying to talk Morrison into cutting back on his substance abuse before he died in 1971.

"He was a good boy. It's too bad I couldn't straighten him out, because I tried awful hard," he said.

But he also recalled numerous good times, among them talking politics with John Lennon in the parking lot and watching members of Led Zeppelin have fun.

"Every time they were in town, they'd party in the middle booth," he said. "And them guys know how to party."

He is survived by his wife, Scarlett; a son, Mikeal; and three grandchildren.

A public memorial is scheduled May 28 at the Rainbow.

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