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11 zingers from Hasan Minhaj's White House Correspondents' Dinner speech

Comedian Hasan Minhaj ripped into President Donald Trump and coverage of his administration in a sweeping address at Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner.

>> Watch Minhaj's full speech here (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised)

Minhaj, a correspondent on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show With Trevor Noah," was announced earlier this month as entertainment for the sold-out event at the Washington Hilton. The president did not attend, instead holding a rally in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

>> PHOTOS: Scenes from the 2017 White House Correspondents’ Dinner

"I get it, I get it. We’ve got to address the elephant that's not in the room," Minhaj joked Saturday. "The leader of our country is not here. And that's because he lives in Moscow. It is a very long flight. It would be hard for (Russian President Vladimir Putin) to make it."As for the other guy, I think he's in Pennsylvania because he can't take a joke."Here are 11 of Minhaj's most brutal zingers from the event:

>> PHOTOS: Revelers arrive for the 2017 White House Correspondents’ Dinner

1. "Who would have thought with everything going on in the country now that a Muslim would be standing on this stage for the ninth year in a row, baby?"

2. "No one wanted to do this, so of course it lands in the hands of an immigrant."

3. "We all know this administration loves deleting history faster than Anthony Weiner when he hears footsteps."

>> Will Ferrell reprises role as George W. Bush for ‘Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner’

4. "For the nine people watching on C-SPAN, there was also another elephant in the room, but Donald Trump Jr. shot it and cut off its tail."

5. "Historically, the president usually performs at the Correspondents' Dinner, but I think I speak for all of us when I say he's done far too much bombing this month."

6. "I do not see Steve Bannon. Not see Steve Bannon. ‘Not-see’ Steve Bannon. 'Nazi’ Steve Bannon."

7. "Mike Pence wanted to be here tonight, but his wife wouldn't let him because apparently one of you ladies is ovulating."

8. "Jeff Sessions couldn't be here tonight; he was busy doing a pre-Civil War re-enactment. On his RSVP, he just wrote "no," just "nooo!" – which happens to be his second-favorite N-word."

>> Read more trending news

9. "Even Hillary Clinton couldn't be here tonight. I mean, she could have been here, but I think someone told her the event was in Wisconsin and Michigan."

10. "It finally happened: Bill O'Reilly has been fired. But then you gave him a $25 million severance package, making it the only package he won't force a woman to touch."

11. "CNN is here, baby. Now you guys got some really weird trust issues going on with the public. I'm not going to call you fake news, but everything isn't breaking news. You can't go to DEFCON 1 just because Sanjay Gupta found a new moisturizer."

Will Ferrell reprises role as George W. Bush for 'Not The White House Correspondents Dinner'

Comedian Will Ferrell reprised his role as former President George W. Bush on Saturday night to thunderous applause at “Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner,” hosted by Samantha Bee.

>> Read more trending news

The event was taped as journalists gathered at the Washington Hilton for the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. Meanwhile, President Donald Trump addressed a crowd in Pennsylvania.

"How do you like me now?" Ferrell asked the crowd gathered at the DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, using his signature Bush twang. “The prodigal son has returned. I don’t know what that means, but I know it’s positive. It’s very prodigal.”

Ferrell has portrayed Bush several times over the course of his career. The character was a fan-favorite impression during Ferrell’s tenure with “Saturday Night Live.” He was a cast member on the sketch comedy show from 1995 to 2002.

“Quick presidential update: I’m doing quite well, thank you,” Ferrell-as-Bush said Saturday. “History’s been kinder to me than many of you thought. For the longest time, I was considered the worst president of all time. That has changed — and it only took 100 days. I needed eight years, a catastrophic flood, a war built on a lie, an economic disaster. The new guy needed 100 days.”

He joked about Bush’s strained relationship with the press, comparing it to the relationship Trump has with the media.

“You guys always sneaked up on me with gotcha questions like, ‘Why are we going to war? Gotcha!’ ‘Why did you not respond to Hurricane Katrina? Gotcha!'” Ferrell-as-Bush said. “Wish someone had just told me that all you have to say is ‘fake news’ over and over again.”

Ferrell-as-Bush went on to present a half-finish portrait of Trump, poking fun at the former president’s recent book release “Portraits of Courage.”

About 2,600 people attended “Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner,” an hour-long special for TBS’ “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” CNN reported. Proceeds from the show will go to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

“Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner” will air Saturday at 10 p.m. on TBS and will be streamed on Twitter at 11 p.m. ET.

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — President Donald Trump's chief of staff, Reince Priebus; Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — Vice President Mike Pence; Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Angus King, I-Maine.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Trump.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

Absent glitter and Trump, journalists honor press freedom

Prominent Washington journalists, if not Hollywood stars, celebrated the First Amendment during the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner, an event that lacked the glitter of past years because of the absence of the president of the United States.

With President Donald Trump sending his regrets, the attention was no longer focused on an in-person roasting of the commander in chief and his humorous remarks about politics and the press. The red carpet that once featured Oscar winners, TV stars and a few major-league athletes barely turned heads.

Instead, speakers at the dinner promoted press freedom and responsibility and challenged Trump's accusations of dishonest reporting.

The stars of the night were Watergate reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who recounted what they learned about journalism from their reporting for The Washington Post that helped lead to President Richard Nixon's resignation more than 40 years ago.

"Like politicians and presidents sometimes, perhaps too frequently, we make mistakes and go too far," Woodward said. "When that happens we should own up to it. But the effort today to get this best obtainable version of the truth is largely made in good faith. Mr. President, the media is not 'fake news.'"

The evening was not without humor aimed at the press and Trump.

"We've got to address the elephant that's not in the room," cracked the entertainment headliner, Hasan Minhaj of "The Daily Show" on TV's Comedy Central. "The leader of our country is not here. And that's because he lives in Moscow. It's a very long flight. As for the other guy, I think he's in Pennsylvania because he can't take a joke."

Trump was indeed in Pennsylvania, having scheduled a rally in Harrisburg to mark his 100th day in office. He began his remarks with a lengthy if familiar attack on the news media while dismissing the dinner and its participants.

"A large group of Hollywood actors and Washington media are consoling each other in a hotel ballroom in our nation's capital right now," Trump said. He added: "And I could not possibly be more thrilled than to be more than 100 miles away from Washington's swamp, spending my evening with all of you and with a much, much larger crowd and much better people, right?"

Trump became the first president since Ronald Reagan in 1981 to skip the event — and Reagan was recovering from an assassination attempt.

The official WHCA dinner began in 1921. In recent decades, the event offered Washington's press corps an opportunity to wear black tie and stunning gowns while mixing with celebrity guests. Most people trace that development to 1987, when Baltimore Sun reporter Michael Kelly brought Fawn Hall, the secretary at the center of the Iran-Contra affair.

Jeff Mason, the WHCA president, said before the event that this year's dinner would have been different even if Trump had attended, "based on the tension that has existed in the relationship and some of the things he has said about the press. We were preparing for a different dinner, either way."

The correspondents' dinner was briefly upstaged Saturday afternoon when late-night TV star Samantha Bee of "Full Frontal" pulled in celebrities for the first "Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner," among them Alysia Reiner of "Orange Is the New Black," Retta of "Parks and Recreation" and Matt Walsh of "Veep."

Bee's taped show, a tongue-in-cheek tribute to American news organizations, featured actor Will Ferrell and other guests roasting Trump and his allies. It singled out the Committee to Protect Journalists, the nonprofit group that will receive proceeds from the broadcast.

The WHCA awards and this year's recipients:

—Aldo Beckman Memorial Award winner: Greg Jaffe of The Washington Post for stories on President Barack Obama's speeches and policies that contrasted the realities of 2016 with the hopes of 2008.

—Merriman Smith Award winner for outstanding White House coverage under deadline: Edward-Isaac Dovere of Politico for his coverage of the historic meeting between Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro.

—Edgar A. Poe Award winner: David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post for stories on Donald Trump's philanthropic claims.

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Associated Press writer Jocelyn Noveck contributed to this report. Follow Jack Gillum on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jackgillum .

Charlotte Rae of ‘Facts of Life’ has bone cancer

“Facts of Life” star Charlotte Rae revealed this week she has been diagnosed with bone cancer, People magazine reported.

>> Read more trending news

The 91-year-old actress, who played matronly Edna Garrett on “The Facts of Life” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” battled pancreatic cancer seven years ago.

“Last Monday, I found out I have bone cancer,” Rae told People. “About seven years ago, I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer — which is a miracle that they found it because usually it’s too late. My mother, sister and my uncle died of pancreatic cancer. After six months of chemotherapy, I was cancer-free. I lost my hair, but I had beautiful wigs. Nobody even knew.” 

Rae, who turned 91 on April 22, said she decided to cancel bone cancer treatment, which was to begin Thursday, People reported. 

“I wanted to think about it first,” she told the magazine. “I think I’m going to go for it. The side effects were not too bad when I did it originally. I’ve had a great life, but I have so many wonderful things happening. I’d like to choose life. I’m grateful for the life I’ve already had.” 

Rae’s philosophy echoes the theme song for “Facts of Life,” which aired on NBC from Aug. 24, 1979, to May 7, 1988: “You take the good, you take the bad, you take them both and then you have the facts of life.”

School superintendent warns parents about '13 Reasons Why' series

In one of the nation’s largest school districts, the superintendent is warning parents of a “dangerous trend” among students after they watched the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why.” 

>> Read more trending news

The series, released March 31 on Netflix, tells the fictional story of the suicide of a 17-year-old girl who leaves behind audio recordings for 13 people who she said were partially responsible for her death. 

Robert Avossa of the Palm Beach County School District in Florida sent a letter home to parents Friday detailing why he is so concerned.

Click here to read the full story.

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — TBA.

___

NBC's "Meet the Press" — Vice President Mike Pence; Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Angus King, I-Maine.

___

CBS' "Face the Nation" — President Donald Trump.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

Nevada Supreme Court rules 'Las Vegas Law' can film in court

The Nevada Supreme Court says a reality television show about Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson and prosecutors in Las Vegas is a news program, and its cameras can be in courtrooms.

The court ruled unanimously Thursday that although it's unusual for the county to get royalties from a film company, "Las Vegas Law" satisfies requirements for news reporting because courtroom proceedings are shown for informational or educational purposes.

Defense attorneys objected during a trial last year of a man convicted of killing a Las Vegas high school student over an iPad.

They argued the show produced by My Entertainment Television is a docudrama made for entertainment and commercial purposes, not news.

The first season of the show aired on Investigation Discovery. A second season is expected later this year.

Fox News sets a new late-afternoon show

Fox News Channel is replacing its late-afternoon program "The Five" with a panel show that looks similar.

Called "The Specialists," the show debuting Monday will feature five people talking about the issues of the day. Eric Bolling, who works on "The Five," is the best-known personality on the new program.

Besides Bolling, the show will feature Katherine Timpf and Eboni Williams, along with a rotating series of guest experts on topics of the day, Fox said Friday. Timpf and Williams are both relatively new to Fox, joining the network in 2015.

"The Five" moved to prime time after the firing of Bill O'Reilly.

The stars shined for Mary Hart; now Daytime Emmys will too

In the early 1980s, Mary Hart became the face — and the famously insured legs — of a new breed of TV show, the entertainment news magazine.

She quickly rose from correspondent to anchor on "Entertainment Tonight," powered by a dazzling smile, unflagging charm and an engagingly deft touch with the celebrities who are the syndicated show's currency.

Many such TV magazines followed to satisfy the public's growing taste for Hollywood buzz, but what became a nearly 30-year run at "ET" made Hart the genre's queen bee.

Her legacy will be recognized Sunday with a lifetime achievement award at the Daytime Emmys ceremony, and Hart pronounces herself thrilled by the honor. She learned of it on a trip to Chicago last fall with husband Burt Sugarman and son AJ to catch a Dodgers-Cubs playoff game.

"My jaw dropped," she said, when the TV academy called with the news. "I know Burt and AJ were looking at me concerned that something awful had happened, because I immediately got emotional."

"It makes me appreciate anew all of the years that I've been able to spend in television," especially her time at "ET," Hart said.

Bob Mauro, president of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, said Hart is a worthy recipient. Betty White, Alex Trebek and Bob Barker are among past honorees.

"As a trusted anchor in the genre of entertainment news, Mary's ability to be embraced by both the stars she interviewed and the audience is the reason that 'ET' has been welcomed into homes across the country for so long," Mauro said.

Hart, born Mary Johanna Harum in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, said that competing in the 1970 Miss America pageant (she was a top 10 finisher) gave her the poise and confidence to aim high — and led to an epiphany.

"I think it literally was the first time I was interviewed on television, I went, 'That's what I want to be doing. I would love to be talking to various people about everything,' " Hart recalled.

She detoured as a high school teacher for three years in her hometown, but then TV beckoned, and she followed the path through TV news and hosting stints in the Midwest before heading to Los Angeles.

After dabbling in acting, including a role on "Days of Our Lives," she co-hosted a syndicated TV magazine and, with Regis Philbin, a short-lived national talk show in 1982. An interview with fledgling "ET" about the cancellation brought a job offer and an adventure.

"We broke ground in television," Hart said of the show. "We created the genre. And we all knew we were doing something new and fun, and it was hard but it was exciting."

She held the anchor job opposite a succession of partners, including John Tesh and Mark Steines, before shifting to "ET" special correspondent.

Photos and memorabilia surround Hart in her office, but she prefers to look ahead, not back. She still keeps her hand in as a host (she's served as emcee of the Palm Springs Film Festival for 13 years), but isn't Hollywood-centric.

She's follows world news and politics closely, she said, and was set to moderate a panel on the international refugee crises. She works with the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and is a National Geographic Society board member.

Asked to recount some of her career highs and lows, the unfailingly gracious Hart was game.

— She interviewed Richard Pryor when she worked on an Oklahoma City talk show in 1977 and found him gruff and uncooperative: "It was kind of an expletive-filled interview that was barely usable," she said.

He was a far different man when she talked him in the late 1980s, in failing health and apologetic for his transgressions. Hart and "ET" visited him regularly after that to check in and bring him fan mail.

"There was such a bond, and I had such appreciation for what a difference he made in millions of people's lives," she said. "And why every comedian today still refers back to Richard Pryor as being one of the biggest influences in their lives."

— An interview with Oscar-winning actress Jane Wyman, then starring on TV's "Falcon Crest," was going well until Hart asked her about ex-husband Ronald Reagan, unaware that Wyman consistently declined to discuss him.

"Things immediately went straight into the toilet," she said, and worsened when Hart brought up the couple's children. "She stood up and said, 'The interview's over.' And that made me want to cry."

She didn't, she said, but it "was a mortifying experience."

— When Hart's impressive legs caught viewers' attention, her then-agent suggested insuring them with Lloyd's of London, reminiscent of a publicity stunt involving World War II pinup Betty Grable.

"I never dreamed it would have legs of its own, so to speak," Hart said. "Nor did I ever believe it would be a big news story. I think it was Dan Rather who opened the "CBS Evening News" one night saying, 'What do the Exxon Valdez and Mary Hart's legs have in common?' To me, that was one of the most astonishing headlines I'd ever heard or seen."

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Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber .

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