Now Playing
106.1 BLI
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
106.1 BLI

society

61 items
Results 11 - 20 of 61 < previous next >

Why is it always so cold in offices?

It's summer. It's hot. Some days it's muggy.

Summer is the season to show off hard-earned physical improvements like more toned calves and triceps that you may have worked for in the winter months. It's also a time to show off tanned complexions -- sometimes earned at pools and on beaches and sometimes purchased at tanning salons.

Plus, for many women, summer is a time when sleeveless shirts, dresses and skirts are appropriate attire to combat the heat. 

But why is wearing light clothing sometimes unbearable and uncomfortable? 

Because workplace offices are often freezing cold. 

Yes, air conditioning is a nice escape from the sweltering heat outside, but sometimes, too much cold air is undesirable.

>> Read more trending stories  

So why is it so cold? And why do so many women have to bring cardigans and light blankets to work while their male colleagues barely notice the temperature?

A piece published in The Washington Post in July 2015 points to "the gender divide -- thermostat edition," alleging air conditioning is a "big, sexist plot."

"All these women who actually dress for the season -- linens, sundresses, flowy silk shirts, short-sleeve tops -- (change) their wardrobes to fit the sweltering temperatures around them," Post reporter Petula Dvorak wrote. "And then there are the men, stalwart in their business armor, manipulating their environment for their own comfort, heaven forbid they make any adjustments in what they wear."

Dvorak poses a question: Will there ever be a day when men wear linen, seersucker or formal shorts to work, adjust the thermostat accordingly, and women can feel comfortable in their offices?

Read more at The Washington Post.

'I can no longer stay silent': Michael Jordan pledges $2M to foster community, police relations

Michael Jordan announced he will donate $2 million to two organizations that strive to improve community and police relations, according to ESPN's sports and culture website The Undefeated.

Jordan released a letter to the sports news site saying that he would donate $1 million to the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s newly established Institute for Community-Police Relations and $1 million to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

>> Read more trending stories  

Jordan wrote that he can "no longer stay silent" in light of recent racial tension and violence between citizens and law enforcement officers. 

He called for new policies to ensure that citizens of color are treated fairly and that police officers receive respect and support. 

Both groups were informed of the donations Sunday night.

"We're surprised and shocked, but obviously thrilled," said Sherrilyn Ifill, the president and director of the Legal Defense Fund. "We've been working on these issues for some many years, and it's great to hear that Michael Jordan and his people are aware of our work and are willing to make a contribution."

"What an opportunity for Michael Jordan to do this and help raise the discussion between police and the members of the communities they serve," said Terrence Cunningham, the IACP president and chief of the Wellesley, Massachusetts, police department. "The IACP aims to provide a toolbox for departments and communities to come together to discuss implicit bias and police legitimacy, and this is an opportunity to help that along."

"I applaud Michael Jordan for these donations," NBA commissioner Adam Silver told The Undefeated Monday. "His championing of important social issues including fundamental civil and human rights carries enormous impact in communities everywhere."

Here is Jordan's full statement:

"As a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers. I grieve with the families who have lost loved ones, as I know their pain all too well. "I was raised by parents who taught me to love and respect people regardless of their race or background, so I am saddened and frustrated by the divisive rhetoric and racial tensions that seem to be getting worse as of late. I know this country is better than that, and I can no longer stay silent. We need to find solutions that ensure people of color receive fair and equal treatment AND that police officers -- who put their lives on the line every day to protect us all – are respected and supported. "Over the past three decades I have seen up close the dedication of the law enforcement officers who protect me and my family. I have the greatest respect for their sacrifice and service. I also recognize that for many people of color their experiences with law enforcement have been different than mine. I have decided to speak out in the hope that we can come together as Americans, and through peaceful dialogue and education, achieve constructive change. "To support that effort, I am making contributions of $1 million each to two organizations, the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s newly established Institute for Community-Police Relations and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The Institute for Community-Police Relations’ policy and oversight work is focused on building trust and promoting best practices in community policing. My donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the nation’s oldest civil rights law organization, will support its ongoing work in support of reforms that will build trust and respect between communities and law enforcement. Although I know these contributions alone are not enough to solve the problem, I hope the resources will help both organizations make a positive difference. "We are privileged to live in the world’s greatest country -- a country that has provided my family and me the greatest of opportunities. The problems we face didn’t happen overnight and they won’t be solved tomorrow, but if we all work together, we can foster greater understanding, positive change and create a more peaceful world for ourselves, our children, our families and our communities."

Read more at The Undefeated

Little boy makes sweet 'survival kits' for officers

A Massachusetts police department said a small gesture from a little boy is going a very long way.

>> Read more trending stories  

Holliston police tweeted a photo of a 6-year-old boy, identified only as Jackson, stopping by the department to pass out dozens of survival kits for the officers.

Inside the kits was candy and a note from the heart:

Lifesaver -- to remind you of the many times you've been oneStarburst -- for the burst of energy that you needPayday -- since you're not doing it for the moneyHershey Kisses -- to show our love for youGum -- to help everyone stick togetherTootsie Roll -- you have to roll with the punchesPeppermint Patty -- helping you keep your coolSnickers -- to help keep your humorMounds -- for the mounds of courage you show

The boy wore a proud smile as he posed for the picture at the station.

The police department was appreciative of the gesture, saying: "The world needs more Jacksons!"

Who is behind the Trump-Cruz kissing billboard near RNC?

A group co-founded by Florida natives is behind a controversial billboard in Cleveland that shows Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump leaning in for a kiss with Sen. Ted Cruz.

>> Read more trending stories  

Aaron Jackson co-founded the organization Planting Peace, which paid for the billboard placed in Cleveland ahead of the Republican National Convention next week, the Northwest Florida Daily News reported. The billboard is approximately five minutes away from Quicken Loans Arena.

Jackson said his global nonprofit organization is "calling for action that brings full, fundamental rights to the LGBT community, and a narrative that empowers LGBT people to live and love freely."

In a statement to the Daily News, he said: "What Donald, Ted and the Republican platform either fail to realize, or realize and just don't seem to care about, is that their words and actions toward our LGBT family -- especially LGBT children -- have meaning and impact. LGBT children hear these messages, telling them they are nothing but second class citizens, and are left feeling somehow broken or 'less than.'"

David Hamet, director of operations for the organization, said that the group is calling for "immediate change in the Republican Party platform with regard to our LGBT family and LGBT rights."

"Never again shall a negative, hateful message be uttered in the name of 'religious freedom.' Our message to our LGBT family remains consistent: You are loved, valued and beautiful," he told the Daily News.

Meanwhile, former NFL quarterback Tim Tebow was allegedly set to attend the convention, but backed out as Trump was set to reveal Mike Pence as his running mate -- a decision that was delayed because of the recent tragedy in Nice, France.

Read more at the Northwest Florida Daily News.

Teenager apologizes to women and minorities in 'White Boy Privilege' poem

A teenager from Atlanta delivered a poem at his school's poetry slam in February, but now, in the wake of a resurgent Black Lives Matter campaign and the deaths of five police officers in Dallas, the poem is gaining attention again.

>> Read more trending stories  

Royce Mann, 14, delivered a poem titled "White Boy Privilege" in front of a crowd of friends, family and school faculty for his school's poetry slam.

"Dear women, I'm sorry. Dear black people, I'm sorry," he begins the poem. "Dear Asian-Americans, dear Native-Americans, dear immigrants who come here seeking a better life, I'm sorry. Dear everyone who isn't a middle or upper class white boy, I'm sorry."

The high schooler offers a genuine perspective on how his race and gender have shaped his experiences and admitted that he'll never know what it's like to live life through a different lens.

"I say now that I would change places with you in an instant, but if given the opportunity, would I? Probably not," he says. "Because to be honest, being privileged is awesome. I’m not saying that you and me on different rungs of the ladder is how I want it to stay. I’m not saying that any part of me has for a moment even liked it that way. I’m just saying that I (expletive) love being privileged and I’m not willing to give that away. I love it because I can say '(expletive)' and not one of you is attributing that to the fact that everyone with my skin color has a dirty mouth." 

At this point in his recitation, a woman can be heard contemplating Mann's words with a thoughtful, "Hmmm."

"I love it because I don’t have to spend an hour every morning putting on make-up to meet other people’s standards," Mann says in reference to his gender.

Then he references his socio-economic status: "I love it because I can worry about what kind of food is on my plate instead of whether or not there will be food on my plate."

"To be honest, I’m scared of what it would be like if I wasn’t on the top rung. If the tables were turned and I didn’t have my white boy privilege safety blankie to protect me," he says. "If I lived a life lit by what I lack, not by what I have, if I lived a life in which when I failed, the world would say, 'Told you so.' If I lived the life that you live."

Watch the full video, which has been viewed on YouTube nearly 300,000 times, and scroll below to read a transcript of the poem. 

<iframe allowfullscreen frameborder="0" width="390" height="320" scrolling="no" id="molvideoplayer" title="MailOnline Embed Player" src="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/embed/video/1307599.html"></iframe>

"Dear women, I’m sorry. Dear black people, I’m sorry. Dear Asian-Americans, dear Native Americans, dear immigrants who come here seeking a better life, I’m sorry. "Dear everyone who isn’t a middle or upper class white boy, I’m sorry. I have started life on the top of the ladder while you were born on the first rung. "I say now that I would change places with you in an instant, but if given the opportunity, would I? Probably not. "Because to be honest, being privileged is awesome. I’m not saying that you and me on different rungs of the ladder is how I want it to stay. I’m not saying that any part of me has for a moment even liked it that way.  "I’m just saying that I (expletive) love being privileged and I’m not willing to give that away,' he says emphatically. 'I love it because I can say '(expletive)' and not one of you is attributing that to the fact that everyone with my skin color has a dirty mouth.  "I love it because I don’t have to spend an hour every morning putting on make-up to meet other people’s standards. "I love it because I can worry about what kind of food is on my plate instead of whether or not there will be food on my plate. I love it because when I see a police officer I see someone who is on my side. "To be honest, I’m scared of what it would be like if I wasn’t on the top rung. If the tables were turned and I didn’t have my white boy privilege safety blankie to protect me.  "If I lived a life lit by what I lack, not by what I have, if I lived a life in which when I failed, the world would say, 'Told you so.' If I lived the life that you live.  "When I was born I had a success story already written for me,' he goes on while the audience sits rapt. 'You were given a pen and no paper. I’ve always felt that that was unfair but I’ve never dared to speak up because I’ve been too scared. "Well now I realize that there’s enough blankie to be shared,' he adds, earning a bit of laughter from those listening.  "Everyone should have the privileges I have,' he recites, his voice getting increasingly louder. 'In fact they should be rights instead. Everyone’s story should be written, so all they have to do is get it read. Enough said.' "No, not enough said. It is embarrassing that we still live in a world in which we judge another person’s character by the size of their paycheck, the color of their skin, or the type of chromosomes they have.  "It is embarrassing that we tell our kids that it is not their personality, but instead those same chromosomes that get to dictate what color clothes they wear and how short they must cut their hair. But most of all, it is embarrassing that we deny this. That we claim to live in an equal country, an equal world."

Ohio police officer Nakia Jones voices outrage over Alton Sterling shooting with powerful Facebook message

An African-American police officer in the Warrensville Police Department in Ohio has spoken out after the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. 

>> Read more trending stories  

In a 7-minute video streamed on Facebook Live, Nakia Jones condemned "prejudiced" and "racist" police officers for biased actions against citizens and voiced her concern about officers who she thinks have failed in their oath to protect and serve.  

“If you are white and you’re working in a black community and you are racist, you need to be ashamed of yourself,” she said. “You stood up there and took an oath. If this is not where you want to work, then you need to take your behind somewhere else.”

But Jones also called out the black community for accusing all police officers of being corrupt.

"It bothers me when I hear people say, ‘Y’all police officers this, y’all police officers that. They put us in this negative category when I’m saying to myself, ‘I’m not that type of police officer.’ I know officers that are like me that would give their life for other people,” Jones said in the video.

Jones, who said she was the first black female officer in Warrensville Heights, said that in 1996 she "became a police officer to make a difference in people’s lives." 

Posted by Nakia Jones on Thursday, February 19, 2015

She also challenged the black community to come together, to strive to be better and to stand up for their rights. 

"Put these guns down because we’re killing each other,” she said. “And the reason why all this racist stuff keeps going on is because we’re divided. We’re killing each other, not standing together.”

Jones ended the video in tears. 

"These are my thoughts," she said. "God bless."

<script>(function(d, s, id) {  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.6";  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script>I am so hurt right now.. I Try not to get into tbese conversations but Im feeling so torn inside.  I became a police...Posted by Nakia Jones on Wednesday, July 6, 2016

During a Facebook Live interview with local reporters Thursday, Jones said she could not comment on her meeting early that day with the chief of police following her Facebook post.

Jones also couldn't comment on when she'll be back to work, but said what's next for her is to "go home and be with my family. I hope this makes a difference."

American Red Cross offers apology for 'super racist' pool safety poster

The American Red Cross has apologized after receiving criticism for a poster that the humanitarian organization used to promote pool safety.

>> Read more trending stories 

"We deeply apologize for any misunderstanding, as it was absolutely not our intent to offend anyone," the American Red Cross said in a statement. 

"We're committed to diversity and inclusion in everything that we do," said William Fortune, a regional communications specialist at the Red Cross.

The organization told NBC News that it discontinued production of the poster and removed it from mobile and web platforms.

The poster came under fire after pool patrons noticed the illustration of a pool scene with "super racist" undertones. 

"Hey, (American Red Cross), send a new pool poster… (because) the current one... is super racist," John Sawyer wrote on Twitter.

The illustration, titled "Be cool, follow the rules," identifies acceptable and unacceptable behavior at a pool setting. In the drawing, children of color are shown committing infractions while white children are shown acting "cool," or exhibiting appropriate behavior.

The "not cool" actions include a black girl pushing another girl into the water, a black boy diving into the water and another black boy gasping for air.

Margaret Sawyer, the former executive director of the Mixteco/Indigena Community Organizing Project, which aids the indigenous community in Ventura County, California, said she first saw the poster at a pool in Salida, Colorado. 

"I thought, 'It must be really outdated. This can't possibly be a recent poster,'" she said. 

But then she saw the same poster at a pool in Fort Morgan, Colorado.

"I felt really angry," she said.

"Staff at both of these city pools had never noticed anything wrong with this poster," Sawyer wrote on Facebook. "(It's) horrifying that children across the country are absorbing this message."

We've seen this racist poster twice now in the town pools of Salida and Fort Morgan, Colorado.  It is from the Red Cross...Posted by Margaret Sawyer on Monday, June 20, 2016

"I just kept staring at it and thinking, 'It looks they're trying to do something here that shows all kids together, of all different backgrounds, but they're clearly not hitting the mark," Sawyer told KUSA.

The Red Cross offered an extended apology: 

"The American Red Cross appreciates and is sensitive to the concerns raised regarding one of the water safety posters we produced. We deeply apologize for any misunderstanding, as it was absolutely not our intent to offend anyone. As one of the nation's oldest and largest humanitarian organizations, we are committed to diversity and inclusion in all that we do, every day.

"Going forward, we are developing more appropriate materials that are more representative of our workforce and the communities we serve. Our aquatic instructors have been notified of these concerns and we will advocate that our aquatic partner facilities remove the poster until revised materials are available."

The organization said it is "currently in the process of completing a formal agreement with a diversity advocacy organization for (its) guidance moving forward," The Washington Post reported.

Black Kids Swim, an online resource for African-American families involved in swimming, and KUSA allege that the posters have been in use since 2014, the New York Daily News reported.

"When I saw the poster, I just, was just very saddened that the Red Cross had chosen to put out an image that might... discourage African-Americans from trying swimming if they were new to it, and also something that would extend a negative stereotype," said Ebony Rosemond, director of Black Kids Swim. "How can an organization that prides itself on being so open-minded, so understanding of the diverse populations of the world, create something like this?"

"I'm just a citizen, I'm not an organization, but I would want the Red Cross to collaborate and build relationships with Black Kids Swim and other organizations that do advocacy around this so that this doesn't happen again," said Sawyer. "Clearly, they're thinking of themselves as only having one constituency, and that's not true."

Texas town erects statue of two girls taking a selfie

A statue that was recently erected in front of a Texas city's town hall is receiving lots of criticism from the town's citizens.

>> Read more trending stories  

The new statue in Sugar Land, Texas, features two smiling women snapping a selfie on a cellphone.

Many people in Sugar Land immediately began complaining about the misuse of taxpayers' money, saying the statue was inappropriate.

But according to documents from the town, the statue was donated by resident Sandy Levin.

The statue was one of 10 in a collection of pieces that will be located at Sugar Land Memorial Park, Oyster Creek Park and a local fire station.

"There was no objection to the donation and proposed location so the project progressed," city documents read. 

Another statue in the area is of a man playing a guitar.

"The sculptures will be of people representing activities that occur in the Square," the documents said. The new statues are "in continuation with the continued vision of the City and the Legacy Foundation’s commitment to establish cultural arts amenities that 'provide and/or support activities and facilities that enrich the artistic, cultural, educational and historical character of Sugar Land.'"

61 items
Results 11 - 20 of 61 < previous next >