Now Playing
106.1 BLI
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
106.1 BLI

health med fit science

200 items
Results 41 - 50 of 200 < previous next >

Feeling depressed? Hot yoga could help

If you want to help put an end to your depression, a new report from the American Psychological Association suggests giving hot yoga a try. 

>> Read more trending news

“Yoga has become increasingly popular in the West, and many new yoga practitioners cite stress-reduction and other mental health concerns as their primary reason for practicing,” Lindsey Hopkins, one of the analysts, said in a statement. “But the empirical research on yoga lags behind its popularity as a first-line approach to mental health.” 

That’s why the scientists from the APA conducted a study to determine how the practice could combat symptoms of depression including anxiety, stress, rumination and worry.

To do so, they led several different studies. In the first one, they rounded up 23 male veterans to participate in twice-weekly yoga classes for eight weeks. The subjects gave the exercise an average enjoyment ranking of 9.4 out of 10, and those with elevated depression scores had a significant decrease in depression symptoms.

» RELATED: Need to relieve stress? Try talking to yourself

For the second one, scientists gathered 52 women ages 25 to 45 and asked more than half of them to attend twice-weekly hot yoga classes for eight weeks. The others were placed on a wait list. At the end of the experiment, those who tried yoga saw a reduction in their depression symptoms compared to those in the control group. 

And in another, they examined 74 mildly depressed university students, giving them a 15-minute instructional video to follow at home for two months. They found that their symptoms had also subsided significantly.

Researchers noted that the practice isn’t a cure-all but should be a complimentary practice to traditional forms of therapy. 

“However,” Hopkins said, “based on empirical evidence, there seems to be a lot of potential.”

CDC: Over 100 people sickened in deadly salmonella outbreak involving Maradol papayas

In an update from officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Friday, the number of people sickened in the salmonella outbreak involving Maradol papayas has grown.

A total of 109 people from 16 states have been infected in the salmonella outbreak as of Aug. 3, the CDC said in a news release.The states involved are CT, DE, IA, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, NC, NJ, NY, OK, PA, TX, VA, and WI.

>> Read more trending news

One death has been reported, and 35 people have been hospitalized, according to the CDC.

An additional strain of salmonella tied to Maradol papayas imported from Mexico has also been discovered, the CDC reported.

The FDA has found salmonella strains in other papayas from Carica de Campeche farm, which expands the original recall notice that urged consumers to avoid Caribeña brand Maradol papayas, distributed by Grande Produce.

The CDC and FDA are continuing their investigation to determine where in the supply chain the papayas became contaminated.

'Narcan parties:' Drug users overdosing to be brought back to life

North Carolina emergency workers in Rowan County expressed frustration Thursday over "Narcan parties," which they said are increasing in the area.

>> Read more trending news

Emergency workers said they've noticed the spike over the past six months, WSOC-TV reported.

"With Narcan readily available and over the counter now, they are having group gatherings called Narcan parties,” said Chris Richardson, Emergency Management Services battalion chief for Rowan County. “They will have numerous people around.” 

He said party-goers get high in houses or cars in public places, then an emergency responder with Narcan will try to revive them, giving the drug user a rush. 

He said a few weeks ago that a couple overdosed on heroin at a shopping center, knowing an ambulance with Narcan was just a call away.

"(They) picked up the drug, didn't want to wait to get to their residence, both wanted to use, they did it in a public place so they would be found," Richardson said. 

The numbers of overdoses are staggering. 

There were 292 calls in 2016 in Rowan County when Narcan was administered. 

This year, through June, they've already had 284 calls for a 94 percent increase. 

The opioid epidemic is staggering in parts of Ohio, too, where officials are saying citizens are taking advantage of emergency services. 

>> Related: Stop sending EMS to respond to overdose calls, Ohio councilman says

>> Related: Ohio factory owner: I need sober workers

Study suggests blowing out birthday cake candles could be health risk

The next time you blow out the candles on a birthday cake, you may want to wish for a strong immune system.

A study published in the Journal of Food Research found that blowing out birthday cake candles left behind 1400 percent more bacteria on the cake's frosting than if candles were not blown out on the cake.

>> Read more trending news

The study suggests that those with health concerns may want to take safety measures when engaging in the birthday cake tradition.

Read the complete study at Journal of Food Research.

Mystery bug bite leaves Arizona man's arm covered in bruises

A routine chore left an Arizona man with a bug bite that caused a severe reaction.

Thomas Jay was taking out the trash earlier this month when he felt something pinch his arm, KPNX reported. A small puncture wound appeared.

>> Read more trending stories

Over the course of a few days, Jay's reaction to the bite spread and became more severe, covering his arm in large, painful bruises. Doctors have not been able to determine what kind of bug bit Jay, and are awaiting biopsy results for further clues.

The Jays did some internet sleuthing and believe the bite may have come from a solpugid (camel spider) or a brown recluse spider.

While Jay is recovering from the mystery bug bite, he continues to experience side effects, including pain, itching and loss of arm strength, KPNX reported. 

CDC: Deadly salmonella outbreak linked to Maradol papayas

Dozens of people have been sickened and at least one person has died in a salmonella outbreak linked to a specific variety of papayas, the Centers for Disease Control said.

A total of 47 people in 12 states have been diagnosed with salmonella infections believed to have been caused by yellow Maradol papayas, the CDC said in a news release.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration is investigating the outbreak and in a Tuesday recall notice, urged consumers to avoid all Caribeña brand Maradol papayas. Grande Produce initiated a limited recall of their Caribeña brand Maradol papayas distributed nationwide from July 7 - July 18, 2017, according to the recall notice.

The FDA said there are reported illnesses in states where Grande Produce did not distribute papayas, so the investigation is ongoing. 

>> Read more trending news 

At least a dozen people have been hospitalized and one death has been reported, according to the CDC. Illnesses were first reported in mid-May and ended in late June, but the CDC said any illness reports filed after June 23 may not be captured in the current data.

The CDC urges all consumers, restaurants and other businesses to refrain from serving and eating yellow Maradol papayas at this time. The yellow Maradol papaya is described by the CDC as "a large, oval fruit that weighs 3 or more pounds, with green skins that turn yellow when the fruit is ripe. The flesh inside the fruit is salmon-colored."

Other forms and brands of papaya are not part of the recall at this time.

Father’s tattoo pays tribute to last time he held young son’s hand

Anthony DeNicola does everything he can to keep the memory of his son, Joseph, alive. 

The 7-year-old died Nov. 4, 2014, just days after going into anaphylactic shock on Halloween. DeNicola, of Staten Island, has created a nonprofit, Joseph’s Helping Hand, to raise awareness of severe food allergies, from which Joseph suffered all his life. 

He also has a tattoo on his arm that commemorates the last time he held his son’s hand. The poignant moment took place as doctors prepared to wheel Joseph into surgery to harvest his organs after the boy was declared brain dead. 

“I’m very proud of it,” DeNicola told the Staten Island Advance about his tattoo. “I look in the mirror every day, and I’m still holding my son’s hand.” 

According to Joseph’s story on the Helping Hands website, he began having problems with allergies almost immediately after his March 2007 birth. Eventually, he was diagnosed with severe allergies to milk, milk proteins, whey and hazelnuts. 

“This is where it all started,” his father wrote on the website. “We had to read the ingredients in everything we bought.”

When Joseph outgrew baby formula, he had to drink soy milk. His family also grew accustomed to carrying around an Epi-Pen and Benadryl wherever they went. 

Even smelling food that contained an ingredient he was allergic to could send Joseph into anaphylaxis, his father wrote. 

On his final Halloween, Joseph went trick-or-treating with family and friends. At a party later that night, his cousins had regular pizza in one room and Joseph had a specially-made pizza in a separate room.

Despite all the precautions, Joseph, whose asthma had been acting up that week, required a breathing treatment with his nebulizer when he got home, his father said. As his breathing worsened, two Epi-Pens failed to bring him out of the reaction, so his father and a neighbor rushed him to the hospital.

“At 5 o’clock, we were trick-or-treating, and at 7 o’clock, we were in the emergency room,” DeNicola told the Staten Island Advance shortly after Joseph’s death

Joseph suffered cardiac arrest in the emergency room, his father said. His brain was deprived of oxygen for 20 to 30 minutes and, four days later, he was declared brain dead. 

>> Read more trending news

Joseph’s doctors said his cause of death was a “one-two punch of asthma and allergies together,” DeNicola told the Advance in 2014. Though no one saw Joseph eat anything he shouldn’t the night he got sick, DeNicola said the smell of the wrong food or someone failing to wash their hands around the little boy could have triggered his fatal allergic reaction. 

After his death, his donated organs saved the lives of five other people, his website said

“Joseph was always a giving little boy,” his father wrote. “If there was a line for something, Joseph would let everyone go first and he would wait quietly for his turn. He never complained.”

The DeNicola family said that donating Joseph’s organs was one of the best things they ever did. 

“It gave us peace and comfort to know that Joseph lives on through all of the people he saved,” the website said. “In life, he was always giving. He will continue to give through his foundation, through education and research on allergies and asthma.”

Customers at Virginia Chipotle report illness, suspect norovirus

Chipotle temporarily closed one of its restaurants in Sterling, Virginia, after an unspecified amount of customers reported illnesses with symptoms consistent with norovirus after eating food at the Mexican grill, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news

According to the AP a “small number” of customers reported the illnesses. 

Chipotle said the company planned to reopen the Virginia location the same day after completing a full sanitation of the restaurant. 

Chipotle officials are working with health officials to discover the cause of the illnesses. Restaurant officials assured customers that norovirus does not come from its food supply.

>> Related: Chipotle testing queso offering

Chipotle’s shares dropped more than six percent Tuesday as investors responded to the incident with concern. 

Symptoms of norovirus include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea. 

In 2015, Chipotle’s revenue and reputation suffered after an E. coli outbreak at restaurants in nine states and a norovirus outbreak at a Boston location. Approximately 500 customers reported illnesses.

“We may be at a higher risk for food-borne illness outbreaks than some competitors due to our use of fresh produce and meats, rather than frozen, and our reliance on employees cooking with traditional methods rather than automation,” Chipotle officials said at the time

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, restaurant workers are often the source of norovirus outbreaks, as they often touch foods such as raw fruits and vegetables with their bare hands before serving them.

In 2016, Chipotle shut down all locations for a day retrain employees on food safety.

 

Man in ICU with potentially fatal respiratory disease spread by mice

A California tour guide is in critical condition after he contracted a rare and potentially deadly respiratory disease spread by deer mice. 

Spencer Fry, 22, of Sacramento, remained on a ventilator in the intensive care unit Monday at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Roseville, where he has been since his family rushed him to the emergency room earlier this month. It was there that Fry was diagnosed with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, a dangerous infection that comes from exposure to hantavirus-infected rodents, their urine or their droppings. 

The California Department of Public Health explained that patients become infected by breathing in air contaminated with dried rodent waste. In California, only deer mice carry the sin nombre virus, the specific hantavirus that causes the syndrome. 

About 36 percent of cases of HPS are fatal.

According to Fox 40 in Sacramento, Fry was working as a tour guide at Bodie State Historic Park, a gold-mining ghost town east of the Sierra Nevadas and about 75 miles from Lake Tahoe, and sleeping in a cabin there. 

Fry’s family told Fox 40 that they visited him over the July 4 holiday, at which time he complained of a headache each day. They grew concerned when he woke up with a fever of 104 degrees.

Fry’s sister, Chantal Todoroff, wrote on a YouCaring page set up on his behalf that the family insisted her brother return to Sacramento with them. Two hours after returning home, they were in the emergency room.

“After a couple of hours in the ER, vomiting began and his lungs began to fill with fluid,” Todoroff wrote

He was rushed to the ICU, where he was sedated and put on a ventilator because he could no longer breathe on his own.

“There is no cure or treatment for hantavirus, so the Kaiser staff is doing everything they can to keep his vitals stable and major organs functioning as they allow his body to fight the virus,” Todoroff wrote. 

She updated the page Tuesday, stating that her brother is awake and communicating with family by using a whiteboard. He remained on the ventilator and doctors continued to drain fluid from his lungs. 

“Through everything, Spencer is still maintaining his sense of humor and staying very positive,” Todoroff wrote. 

>> Read more trending news

Though the California Department of Parks and Recreation has not confirmed that Fry contracted hantavirus at Bodie, his family believes that is the case. His father, Curtis Fry, told Fox 40 that his son could hear mice running around inside the cabin where he slept. 

The news station reported that another person died after contracting hantavirus at Bodie in 2011. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that there was also an outbreak of hantavirus infections among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park in the summer of 2012. Eight of the 10 cases saw the person experience hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and five ended up on ventilators.

Three of those infected at Yosemite died, the CDC said

Early symptoms of the illness include fever, fatigue and muscle aches, the CDC said. A sufferer may also have headaches, like Fry did, as well as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. 

The more dangerous later symptoms, which appear four to 10 days after the illness begins, include fluid in the lungs, shortness of breath and coughing. According to the CDC, one survivor described the feeling of the building fluid as “a tight band around (his) chest and a pillow over (his) face.”

Between 1993 and 2015, a total of 659 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome were recorded. Of those cases, 235 ended in death, the CDC said. 

Do low-calorie sugar substitutes, artificial sweeteners help you lose weight?

Of the 41 percent of American adults and 25 percent of U.S. children who consume artificial sweeteners, most consume them at least once a day, according to a study published earlier this year.

» RELATED: These 9 healthy-sounding foods have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut 

And the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has said artificial sweeteners can be used to manage weight or blood sugar by limiting energy intake.

But if you’re looking for a sweet secret solution to your weight loss woes, new research warns against falling into the growing trap of artificial sweeteners or low-calorie sugar substitutes for weight management.

>> Read more trending news

In fact, according to the new study, published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), artificial sweeteners (like stevia, aspartame or sucralose) may actually lead to heart disease, higher risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and long-term weight gain.

» RELATED: Exercising to lose weight? Skip these popular workouts 

To determine whether or not artificial sweeteners are associated with the negative long-term effects previous studies have cited, researchers from the University of Manitoba’s George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation examined more than 11,000 studies on both artificial and natural sweeteners, performed a meta-analysis of 37 studies and then divided them into randomized controlled trials (seven) and longitudinal studies (30).

» RELATED: Are artificial sweeteners safe (and how much can you have)? 

In total, scientists followed more than 400,000 people for an average of 10 years, with seven of those studies (the randomized controlled trials) involving 1,003 people for an average of six months.

Here’s what the researchers found:

  • In the short seven randomized control trials of 1,003 people, those who consumed artificial sweeteners did not lose or gain more weight or see a decrease in body mass index (BMI) or in waist circumference than the controls in that group.
  • The 30 longer, observational studies showed people who consumed those low-calorie sweeteners were actually more likely to face increased risk of type 2 diabetes (14 percent), obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and other related cardiovascular issues (32 percent higher risk for the heaviest participants compared to the lightest).
  • The longer observational studies also pointed toward an increase in BMI and waist circumference due to consumption of artificial sweeteners.

» RELATED: New study on Splenda's link to cancer sparks controversy 

“Despite the fact that millions of individuals routinely consume artificial sweeteners, relatively few patients have been included in clinical trials of these products. We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management,” Ryan Zarychanski, assistant professor at University of Manitoba and author of the study, said.

But there are some limitations to the study. For example, the way people consumed artificial sweeteners in the clinical trials may not exactly mimic how people would actually consume them.

» RELATED: Scientists say eating cheese can help weight loss 

Most of those involved in the randomized trials were on a weight-loss program, but the larger population consuming low-calorie sweeteners may not be doing so to lose weight.

It’s important to remember the study’s findings are associations, not cause and effect.

But lead author Meghan Azad, who is also an assistant professor, cautioned against the consumption of artificial sweeteners until more research is done to identify long-term health effects.

Azad and her colleagues are currently researching how such sweeteners consumed by pregnant women may impact their baby’s weight, metabolism and gut bacteria, according to Medical News Today.

In the meantime, instead of using artificial sweeteners as a healthy substitute for sugar, try to decrease your sweet tooth altogether by consuming fruit-infused water, black coffee or plain yogurt with fruit, Azad told NPR.

Read the full study at CMAJ.ca. 

200 items
Results 41 - 50 of 200 < previous next >