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Read transcripts of Rep. Devin Nunes’ news conferences about Trump surveillance

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-California) announced Wednesday that he had seen evidence that communications between President Donald Trump and members of his transition team were "incidentally collected" during surveillance operations of foreign targets.

Nunes, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, went to the White House Wednesday afternoon to tell the president about the communications because, he said, he was concerned that the information might have been improperly distributed to several U.S. spy agencies.

The information collected had nothing to do with the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, the chairman said. FBI director James Comey said Monday that the agency is investigating any possible connection between the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the election. 

Nunes apologized Thursday to Democrats on the committee for not sharing the information with them before he went to the White House to talk to the president about what he had been given. 

Below are the transcripts for the two news conferences that Nunes held Wednesday.

Here is the transcript from Rep. Nunes’ first press conference on Wednesday

“Good morning everyone.

As promised I continue to keep you appraised of new developments. Some significant developments, I think, occurred of the course of the last few days with information that was brought to my attention, and I’m gonna just sort of read a very brief statement, and that’s about all I can tell you, but I want to keep you fully informed of what’s, uh, happening.

At our open hearing on Monday, I encouraged anyone who has information about relative topics, including surveillance on President-elect Trump or his transition team, to come forward and speak to members of the Committee. I also said that while there was no a physical wiretap of Trump Tower, I was concerned that other surveillance activities were used against President Trump and his associates. So first, I recently confirmed that on numerous occasions, the intelligence community incidentally collected information about U.S. citizens involved in the Trump transition. Details about persons associated with the incoming administration, details with little apparent foreign intelligence value were widely disseminated in intelligence community reporting. Third, I have confirmed that additional names of Trump transition team members were unmasked. And forth and finally, I want to be clear, none of this surveillance was related to Russia, or the investigation of Russian activities, or of the Trump team. The House Intelligence Committee will thoroughly investigate the surveillance, and its subsequent dissemination, to determine, a few things here that I want to read off:

Who was aware of it?

Why it was not disclosed to Congress?

Who requested and authorized the additional unmasking?

Whether anyone directed the intelligence community to focus on Trump associates?

And whether any laws, regulations, or procedures were violated?

I’ve asked the directors of FBI, NSA, and CIA to expeditiously comply with my March 15th letter that you all received a couple of weeks ago, and provide a full account of these surveillance activities. I informed Speaker Ryan this morning of this information, and I will be going to the White House this afternoon to share what I know with the president and his team. Before I get to questions I want to say that, uh, as you know there has been what appears to be a terrorist attack in the United Kingdom, obviously very concerned and our thoughts and prayers go out to our strong friends and allies over across the pond.

And with that I’ll open it up to questions.

Reporter: Mr. Nunes, were any of these communications potentially picked up at Trump Tower?

Nunes: Uh, we don’t know that yet, that’s why we need to get the information. I will say this, the NSA has been very, very helpful. They know how important these programs are, they are in constant communication with our team, and as you know they partially complied with our request last week, and I expect them to hopefully get more information by Friday. And I have spoke to Admiral Rogers about these concerns, and he wants to comply as quickly as he can.

Reporter: And was the president also part of that incidental collection? 

Nunes: Yes … yes.

Reporter: So let me just clarify: the president of the United States’s personal communications were intercepted as an incidental part of—

Nunes: Well what I think we have—well what I think we have—when we talk about intelligence products here, we’ve got to be very careful. From what I know right now, it looks like incidental collection. We don’t know exactly how that was picked up, umm, but we’re trying to get to the bottom of it.

Reporter: So the president of the United States’s personal communications were intercepted in incidental collection, not in a targeted way? 

Nunes: It’s possible. We won’t know until we get the information on Friday. And that’s why, look, I think the NSA’s going to comply. I am concerned—we don’t know whether or not the FBI is going to comply. I have placed a call, I’m waiting to talk to Director Comey, hopefully later today.

Reporter: Are you concerned that any of the surveillance was done illegally, or as incidental but a legal, you know, a warrant . . .

Nunes: Yeah, that’s a really good question. So, I believe it was all done legally. I think it was all obtained legally. The question is was it masked, why was it unmasked because it appears we have no information about additional unmaskings. And then who was on the dissemination list, and was the dissemination list so far if it was such specific information about the Trump transition. And it appears, just to give you one piece of information I think might be helpful, it appears most of this occurred from what I’ve seen in November, December, and January, so that should probably—so during the transition.

Reporter: So you said that the president’s communications were incidentally collected, but then you said it’s also possible, so was it collected or is it possible it was collected?

Nunes: I just don’t know the answer to that yet.

Reporter: So you don’t know if the president’s communications were—

Nunes: Look, I know that there was collection, regarding the President-elect and his team. I don’t know if it was actually, physically a phone call.

Reporter: You don’t know if it was the president himself, his communication?

Nunes: I do not know that. 

Reporter: Mr. Chairman, did the president’s conversations or anything about the president appear in intelligence reports, is that what you’re saying?

Nunes: I have seen intelligence reports that clearly show, that, uh, the President-elect and his team were I guess at least monitored and disseminated out in intelligence, in what appears to be raw—well I shouldn’t say raw—but intelligence reporting channels. As best as I can say that until I can actually get all of the information that we’ve requested.

Reporter: You said you have to go and brief the administration—

Someone: Please talk to the cameras!

Reporter: Shouldn’t the administration be briefing you?

Nunes: Well, the administration isn’t aware of this, so I need to make sure I go over there and tell them what I know. Because it involves them.

Reporter: You said this was not related to Russia investigations? Can you give us some idea—

Nunes: The information that I have seen has nothing to do with Russia or the Russian investigations. So bluntly put, everything that I was able to view did not involve Russia or any discussions with Russia,s or any trump people or other Russians talking, or, so none of it has to do with Russia—that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, it just means we don’t have it.

Reporter: Can you give us a broader sense of what it was related to?

Nunes: It—look, a lot of it appears like it was, it looks to me like it was all legally collected, but it was essentially a lot of information on the President-elect and his transition team and what they were doing.

Reporter: Was it incidental collection, or [unintelligible] collection?

Nunes: I think, uh, from what I’ve seen it appears to be incidental collection. Any other questions, guys?

Reporter: Wait, so what was found, just to be clear—it was—the material that you have seen so far, doesn’t make any reference or connection to Russia, or are you saying the incidental investigations themselves more broadly were not?

Nunes: Yeah, so this information was legally brought to be by sources who thought that we should know it. And it was, it had, there were no references whatsoever in everything that I read, and it was dozens, let’s just say, let’s leave it at that, dozens of reports, and there was no mention of Russia.

Reporter: And that was [unintelligible] by the person that brought that information to you?

Nunes: That’s correct.

Reporter: [Unintelligible]

Nunes: I’m not going to get into the sources, or when it arrived, but I wanted to brief the Speaker, which is what I did this morning, and obviously I briefed, I put in calls to the directors, I’ve spoken to the CIA Director and the NSA Director, and I’m waiting to talk to Director Comey, and I’m going to head to the White House after the votes.

Reporter: Does this change—you’ve said repeatedly that the President was wrong when he said he was wiretapped at Trump Tower.

Nunes: Well, what we’ve said from day one that there wasn’t a physical wiretap of Trump Tower, we don’t have any evidence to show that at all, but what I read—there was clearly significant information about President Trump and his team and there were additional names that were unmasked. Which is why we sent that letter on the 15th.

Reporter: Is this a response to that letter?

Nunes: No, no it was not. This was information brought to me by sources and I’m hoping that NSA, FBI, CIA get me anything else they have.

Reporter: Do you plan to make this information available now or in the future?

Nunes: You mean publicly? It’s all classified information. We’re hopeful we’re going to get the information I’ve seen plus a lot more information on Friday.

Reporter: Was this surveillance or a criminal investigation?

Nunes: No, it has nothing to do with any criminal investigation. This is normal incidental collection, at least from what I was able to read.

Reporter: [Unintelligible] surveillance, then they have to have a basis for surveillance, isn’t that correct?

Nunes: No, it was not criminal. It was normal foreign surveillance, is what it looks like to me. But let’s wait until we get all the information.

Reporter: So this was about President Trump, but not necessarily about his communications specifically?

Nunes: As of right now that’s what I’ve seen, but it’s hard to know until we get all the information and talk to the appropriate agencies.

Reporter: You said you’re not confident where collection took place and you’re not confident who it involves—

Nunes: No, because all I was able to see was reports—reports on information that was collected.

Reporter: How can you be confident, then, that it did not have anything to do with Russia and the Russia investigation?

Nunes: Because I read through them and there was no mention of Russia.

Reporter: Specifically are we talking about Paul Manafort, like here and his communications, or any other senior level Trump officials?

Nunes: No, no. This appears to be all legally collected foreign intelligence under FISA, where there was incidental collection that then ended up in reporting channels and was widely disseminated.

Reporter: Can you say which individuals in particular?

Nunes: Not at this time.

Reporter: You say that this is routine collection, incidental collection. Are you surprised by this today?

Nunes: Yeah, I’m actually alarmed by it. We went through this about a year and a half ago as it related to members of Congress, if you may remember there was a report—I think it was in the Wall Street Journal—and there was a whole series of hearings, and then we had to have changes as to how members of Congress are informed if members of Congress are picked up in surveillance. And this looks like—it’s very similar to that, it reminds me of what happened a year and a half ago.

Reporter: Could this have been the result of reverse targeting?

Nunes: I don’t know. I’ve only—like I said, I’ve seen dozens of reports, I don’t know if there’s more than that, but clearly I thought it was important enough to tell all of you, inform the speaker, and then go to the White House and inform them. Because I think—they need to see it, if they don’t have it they need to see it.

Reporter: You’re confident that this is [unintelligible] information?

Nunes: It’s official IC information.

Reporter: Did you receive this from members of the intelligence community who are officially communicating it to you, or was this—

Nunes: I don’t want to get into this, for the protections of American citizens, as you can imagine.

Reporter: Which foreign country are we referring to here?

Nunes: I’m not going to get into the exact countries.

Reporter: Will this broaden the scope of your investigation, and what do you think of Democrats’ calls for an independent commission or counsel?

Nunes: Uh, no, I mean, we’re doing our investigation, we’re following the facts where they lead, and clearly I thought this was important enough to come publicly and say what I have so far.

Reporter: Is there definitely none of this pre-election, is this all during the transition period?

Nunes: I don’t know that, but what I’ve seen is post-election.

Reporter: Is it the surveillance itself that alarms you or is it the unmasking and dissemination, or both?

Nunes: All the above. I’m really bothered by the unmasking, which is why we sent that letter on the 15th, because I want to see what additional names were unmasked. And now I know—it appears there were additional names that were unmasked.

Reporter: What is it about the surveillance itself that alarms you if that was possibly just routine incidental collection on a foreign target?

Nunes: I guess, from what I read, it just—it bothers me that that would have any foreign intelligence value whatsoever, and why people would need to know that about president elect trump and his transition team.

Reporter: Just to be clear, were these communications actually collected inside Trump Tower?

Nunes: We don’t know, we don’t know that.

Reporter: How do you not know if it was Trump’s personal communications? Wouldn’t that be clear?

Nunes: Because until I get all the information in its entirety from all the agencies, then we can go through it and we can go back and ask those kinds of questions, but I would just be speculating at this point.

Reporter: Can you just say, do you think right now, the NSA or a member of the intelligence community was spying on Trump during the transition period?

Nunes: Well, I guess it all depends on the one definition of spying. Clearly it bothers me enough, I’m not comfortable with it, and I want to make sure that the White House understands it and that’s why I briefed the Speaker this morning on this.

Reporter: But you think he may have been spied on?

Nunes: I’m not going to get into legal definitions here, but clearly I have a concern.

Below is the transcript of the second press conference, held at the White House following Nunes’ meeting with the president.

Nunes: I haven’t had a chance to brief a lot of you in the past, but just to have a chance to keep you updated with what’s happening with this investigation. Today I briefed the President on the concerns that I had about incidental collection and how it relates to President-elect Trump and his transition team, and the concerns that I had. As I said earlier, there will be more information, hopefully by Friday. The NSA is cooperating very very well. And lastly I’ll say that the reports that I was able to see did not have anything to do with Russia or the Russia investigation or any ties the Trump team. And with that, I’ll take a couple questions.

Reporter: Can I ask you a question? Why is it appropriate for you to brief President Trump given that it’s his own administration or campaign associates that are a part of this investigation? Doesn’t it appear to be interference in some form?

Nunes: Because what I saw has nothing to do with Russia and nothing to do with the Russia investigation. It has everything to do with surveillance activities, and the President needs to know that these intelligence reports are out there, and I have a duty to tell him that.

Reporter: Is it appropriate to be drawing conclusions before it was completed?

Nunes: I’m not drawing any conclusions, I’m just telling the President what exists in intelligence reports.

Reporter: Are the subjects of surveillance under FISA orders?

Nunes: It appears so. I don’t want to get too much into these details, but these were intelligence reports. It brings up a lot of concerns about whether things were properly minimized or not. But I’ll tell you, I’ve only seen some, it’s in the dozens. We don’t have the full scope of all the intelligence reports that have been produced or who ordered the unmasking of the names.

Reporter: The surveillance—if it wasn’t related to Russia or anything like that, are you saying that it was political surveillance of political opponents, as suggested in his tweets?

Nunes: What I’ve read bothers me. And I think it should bother the President himself and his team, because I think some of it seems to be inappropriate, but like I said, before we get all the information to the committee, it’s hard to really say.

Reporter: We knew that there was some incidental collection, because Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn was caught talking to Sergey Kislyak. Does this go beyond that, and does this qualify as the kind of wiretapping the President was tweeting about?

Nunes: It definitely goes beyond what happened to General Flynn—now of course, we don’t officially know yet what happened to Gen. Flynn. We just know that his name leaked out, but we don’t know how it was picked up yet. That’s why we asked in our March 15th letter for the NSA, CIA, and FBI to get us all the unmasking that was done. And I’ll tell you, NSA is being cooperative, but the FBI has not yet let us know whether they’re going to respond to our March 15th letter, which is now a few weeks old.

Reporter: And again, does this seem to describe what the President was talking about, he was talking about, quote, wiretapping, which he then said was broader?

Nunes: You—what I’ve read, there seems to me to be some level of surveillance activity, perhaps legal, but I don’t know that it’s right and I don’t know that the American people would be comfortable with what I read, but let us get all the reports.

Reporter: So the President was correct in what he tweeted?

Nunes: It is possible.

Reporter: The President said that President Obama tapped his phones. Did you see anything—

No, no, no. That did not happen. I’ve said this for many, many weeks, including the day after or a couple days after in front of the press. That never happened.

Reporter: Did you see anything to suggest that President Obama ordered any kind of surveillance on the President-elect?

Nunes: Well, we don’t know who sent the taskings, if the taskings were changed into what went into these intelligence reports. But we’re going to try to find that out.

Reporter: Did you have permission to put out this information today, did the Justice Department give you the OK to do that?

Nunes: This is information that was brought to me that I thought the President needed to know about incidental collection, where the President himself and others in the Trump transition team were clearly put into intelligence reports that ended up in this White House and across a whole bunch of other agencies. And I thought it was important that the President know this. That’s why I briefed the Speaker this morning, and that’s why I came down here as soon as I could.

Reporter: How many people are you seeing in these reports, and do any of them currently work at the White House?

Nunes: I don’t want to get into the details. We don’t have—I was only able to see a few dozen, of which I think a lot of it does have foreign intelligence value. There were dozens of reports that I was able to see and we’re hoping that the NSA, FBI, CIA will provide—I know they exist, so I want them to provide them to our committee—so that all the members have an opportunity to see what I have been shown.

Reporter: What did the President tell you after you briefed him about it?

Nunes: I think the President is concerned and he should be. I think he’d like to see these reports. And hopefully when we get them, they’ll get them to the White House also.

Reporter: Do you believe the President appropriately used the word wiretap, was it used correctly in his tweets, based on the information that you have seen?

Nunes: Well, I think the wiretapping, if you use it generally, the President has said, he clearly used it differently than what I think a lot of people took it—did Obama wiretap Trump Tower which we knew didn’t happen—I think the President has been pretty clear on that—

Reporter: But the physical act of wiretapping, do you see anything in the information that—

Nunes: No, no. And I said that on day two.

Reporter: Can you rule out the possibility that senior Obama administration officials were involved in this?

Nunes: No we cannot.

Reporter: Given that you have said there was a FISA warrant which would have been approved by a judge, are you concerned that essentially you’re saying that members of the Trump team were in contact with people who were the target of a counterintelligence or some form of investigation?

Nunes: No, I think you’re reading too much into this. This is normal intelligence reporting, the question is, should he himself or others - should they have been put into these reports. I don’t know the answer to that yet, but we’re trying to get to the bottom of it.

Reporter: So your issue is the unmasking, not that there was [unintelligible]

Nunes: Well, there’s two issues here. There’s additional unmasking of names, which I think is totally inappropriate, but we—I don’t know how many names were unmasked, but I know these additional unmaskings occurred. And then we have the additional issue of the names that were put into these intelligence reports that we have to get to the bottom of. And this is why we sent the letter two weeks ago.

Reporter: Chairman, if I could just clarify and ask a few things. Are you suggesting that Mr. Trump [unintelligible] And third, why did you not take this up with Representative Schiff before going to the White House?

Nunes: Yes, no, and I’m going to be meeting with Mr. Schiff at some point to talk about where to go with this investigation. But I had to brief the speaker first, then I had to talk to the NSA, the CIA Director, then I have to talk to the FBI Director, then I had to talk to all of you, and then I voted, and then I said I was coming here to brief the President.

Reporter: Just to clarify, you’re concerned about this but you’re not calling for an additional investigation?

Nunes: Well, we are investigating.

Reporter: You just said no.

Nunes: No, incidental—we’re already investigating.

Reporter: You said it has nothing to do with Russia and you’re folding this in—

Nunes: Well, you’re folding this in—the unmasking of names—

Reporter: So an ongoing investigation and you thought it was appropriate to come and talk to the President about that.

Nunes: Remember, we have had an ongoing investigation into Russia for a very, very long time, and all of their activities. We have scoping document in the Russia investigation and we will continue to investigate anything and everything else that might be caught up in this.

Reporter: So Mr. Trump’s communications were in fact monitored? Can you tell us what he was communicating about or who he was communicating with?

Nunes: No, I can’t say that.

Reporter: You also said somebody brought you this communication. Can you tell us anything—

Nunes: I can say that we’ve been asking for people to come forward. They came through the proper channels and have clearances and I’m just going to leave it at that because we have to protect people who came forward in the right manner. I’m not even going to say it’s one person.

Reporter: To be clear, you talk about this as being collected incidentally. But you say it had nothing to do with Russia. Are you suggesting these communications could have been collected as part of a criminal investigation, a criminal warrant?

Nunes: No. In the dozens of reports I was able to see, I was able to determine that it looks like it was legal collection, incidental collection, that made itself into intelligence reports. It has to do with FISA, and there are multiple FISA warrants that are out there, but there’s nothing criminal at all involved.

Reporter: Was it information that was looked at it in real time, or was it information that was collected, held, scored -

Nunes: It was fairly quick, from what I’ve seen, but we have to—once we get the reports, we can ask more questions of the agencies that produced them.

Reporter: If it’s legal collection, wouldn’t it be inappropriate of you to talk about it, and are you attempting to give the president political cover in his talk about wiretapping?

Nunes: The reason that we do this, that we have all these procedures in place, is to protect American citizens who are incidentally collected. There are certain thresholds that have to be met to make it into foreign intelligence products. If something else happens, it appears to me like there were things like maybe they didn’t meet the level of foreign intelligence value, and if that’s the case -

Reporter: But just to clarify, this is not intentional spying on Donald Trump or anyone in his—

Nunes: I have no idea—we won’t know that until we get to the bottom of whether, did people ask for the unmasking of additional names on the President-elect’s transition team.

Reporter: You’ve said legal and incidental. That doesn’t sound like a proactive effort to spy.

Nunes: I would refer to you to—we had a similar issue with members of Congress that were being picked up in incidental collection. We had to spend a full year working with the DNI on proper procedures for members of Congress to be notified.

Reporter: Was the president unmasked? Was his name unmasked?

Nunes: I’m not going to get into that, but I have every indication that it’s clear who’s in these reports.

Reporter: Who would have access to those unmasked names?

Nunes: We don’t know that yet.

 

Cities worldwide show solidarity with London after terror attack

People across the globe showed solidarity with the victims of Wednesday’s deadly terror attack in London.

>> Read more trending stories

Police said four people, including the suspected attacker, were killed and more than 40 people were injured Wednesday afternoon in the attack outside the British Parliament building.

Among those killed was the suspected assailant, identified by police as 53-year-old Briton Khalid Masood. Authorities said Masood slammed a vehicle into people on Westminster Bridge before attacking Keith Palmer, a police officer who was guarding Parliament.

American Keith W. Cochran, who was visiting London to celebrate his 25th wedding anniversary, and English teacher Aysha Frade, 43, were also killed.

The flag above Scotland Yard, the headquarters for London's Metropolitan Police Service, was flown at half-mast in remembrance of the victims.

American killed in London terror attack was celebrating 25th wedding anniversary

An American tourist was among four people who were killed when a man plowed through several people on London’s Westminster Bridge on Wednesday before attacking a police officer who was guarding Parliament.

>> Read more trending stories

The terror attack claimed the life of Utah resident Kurt W. Cochran, family members said in a statement.

Cochran was visiting London with his wife, Melissa, to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. They were expected back in the United States on Thursday.

Melissa Cochran suffered what family members described as “serious injuries” in the attack.

“We express our gratitude to the emergency and medical personnel who have cared for them and ask for your prayers on behalf of Melissa and our family,” the family’s statement said. “Kurt will be greatly missed, and we ask for privacy as our family mourns and as Melissa recovers from her injuries.”

Family members told KSTU that the couple was on a “dream vacation” and spent time in Germany and Austria before arriving in London.

“Our family is heartbroken,” the family statement said. “Kurt was a good man and a loving husband.”

London metropolitan police said four people died in the London terror attack, including Cochran, the unidentified assailant and Keith Palmer, a 15-year veteran of the London metropolitan police force who was killed as he was protecting Parliament.

The fourth victim was identified by The Guardian as Aysha Frade, 43, a mother of two who taught Spanish at DLD College in London.

Police said they have arrested eight people in connection with the attack. They continued to investigate on Thursday.

Health care insurance vote: What time is the vote; what does the bill do; who is voting against it?

The Republican bill that is set to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is scheduled for a vote Thursday, as President Donald Trump and leaders in the House scramble to secure enough support for the measure to pass.

The American Health Care Act could be dead on arrival at the House, however, as a number of Republican lawmakers are saying they intend to vote “no” on the bill.

The bill would repeal and replace some of the Affordable Care Act, shifting the way millions of Americans fund their health care needs. It would also mean that millions would be left without the health care they gained under the ACA, or Obamacare.

Here’s a look at the AHCA and what is scheduled to happen today.

What does the bill do?

According to Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, (R-Wisconsin), the AHCA will retain some of the features of the ACA – insurers would still be required to cover customers with pre-existing conditions, for instance – but would take a sharp turn on others.

The bill would eliminate the requirement that a person have health insurance. It would also give larger companies a break by saying they are no longer required to provide coverage for employees. It will allow insurers to charge older Americans higher health care premiums.

The bill keeps the ACA provision that allows children to stay on a parent’s plan until they turn 26, but it cuts the amount of tax credits that are in place for those buying insurance, and reduces Medicaid spending in the states. In addition, it provides fewer funds for subsidies.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, the new bill would reduce the deficit by $337 billion during the next 10 years, but cost 24 million Americans their coverage over the next decade.

Will it pass?

That’s to be seen. Early on Thursday, it was not looking like Republicans had enough votes among their membership for the bill to pass. Republicans need 216 votes to move the bill to the Senate. That means they can lose no more than 21 of their current 237 votes. If they lose 22 votes the result would be a 215 to 215 tie. If the vote is a tie, the bill fails.

Who is on the fence?

That count has varied over the past two days, but as of 7 a.m. on Thursday, here’s a list compiled from several sources of legislators who say they are leaning toward voting “no” on the bill.

  1. Justin Amash, R-Mich. 
  2. Dave Brat, R-Va.
  3. Mo Brooks, R-Ala. 
  4. Rod Blum, R-Iowa
  5. Ted Budd, R-N.C. 
  6. Rick Crawford, R-Ark.
  7. Warren Davidson, R-Ohio
  8. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.
  9. Scott DesJarlais, R-Tenn.
  10. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y.
  11. Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Pa. 
  12. Tom Garrett, R-Va. 
  13. Louie Gohmert, R-Tx. 
  14. Paul Gosar, R-Az. 
  15. Andy Harris, R-Md. 
  16. Walter Jones, R-N.C. 
  17. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio
  18. John Katko, R-N.J. 
  19. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho 
  20. Leonard Lance, R-N.J. 
  21. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J.
  22. Thomas Massie, R-Ky.
  23. Mark Meadows, R-N.C.
  24. Scott Perry, R-Pa. 
  25. Bill Posey, R-Fl.
  26. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fl. 
  27. Chris Smith (R-NJ)
  28. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa. 
  29. Robert Wittman, R-Va. 
  30. Ted Yoho, R-Fl. 
  31. David Young, R-Iowa

(Sources: CBS News; Huffington Post; Twitter; The Associated Press)

The House Freedom Caucus, a group of conservative Republicans, many of whom identify with the Tea Party, will meet with the president at 11:30 a.m. Thursday. Some votes could change after that meeting. 

(Update: The Associated Press reports at 1:30 p.m. ET that the “House Freedom Caucus chairman says "no deal"was  reached on health bill after meeting with Trump, putting vote in doubt.”)

If it does pass, what then?

If the bill passes the House, it moves to the Senate where Senators will have a chance to add to, or subtract from the bill. If the bill gets to a vote on the floor of the Senate, Republicans will face a similar close margin when it comes to passage. Republicans have a 52-48 advantage in the Senate, so they could lose only two GOP votes and still pass the bill.

Like the NFL, nothing ends in a tie in the Senate. If the vote happened to be 50-50, Vice President Mike Pence would cast the deciding vote.

If it doesn’t pass, what then?

Another bill could be introduced to either fully repeal the ACA, or to offer something like the bill that is up for a vote Thursday, but with some modifications.

When is the vote? 

There is no set time for the vote yet. Meetings will be happening throughout the day prior to a call for the vote. The vote could also be delayed for another time, but Ryan has said that wouldn’t happen. (Update: The vote has been moved to Friday, or possibly beyond. This post will be updated when the time for the vote gets near. Check back here during the day Friday).

7 things to know now: Trump conversations collected; health care vote; Sweet 16 play; London attack

Here's a roundup of news trending across the nation and world today.

What to know now 

1. Trump communications collected: Rep. Devin Nunes, (R-California), announced Wednesday that private conversations between President Donald Trump and his transition team may have been improperly distributed to spy agencies after they were inadvertently collected as part of an intelligence investigation of other targets. Nunes said he was troubled enough by information provided to him about the communications to go to the White House on Wednesday to inform the president in person. Nunes said the information collected had nothing to do with the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. The FBI said Monday it is investigating any possible connection between the Trump campaign and Russian meddling in the election.

2. Health care vote: A vote on a health care bill that is essential in repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act – Obamacare – is set to take place Thursday in the House. Trump and leaders in the House have lobbied members to vote for the bill, but as of late Wednesday, they had not locked down enough votes for it to pass. The president has warned those who don’t vote for the bill that they could face consequences come re-election.

3. London attack: A man stabbed a London police officer to death Wednesday after he ran down pedestrians on a bridge near Parliament in a terror attack on the British government. Four people, including the attacker, were killed, and at least 40 others injured. British lawmakers sheltered in place in Parliament for hours after the mid-afternoon attack. One woman was pulled alive from the waters of the Thames after she was either knocked off the Westminster Bridge or jumped to avoid the car. The suspect has not been identified. An early morning raid in the London area Thursday netted seven people suspected of being involved with the attack. 

4. Wisconsin shootings: A Wisconsin police officer and three others were killed Wednesday in what law enforcement officials said was a domestic violence incident that led to three separate shootings. The shootings took place in a bank, at an attorney’s office and in an apartment complex near Everest, Wisconsin, which is about 90 miles west of Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

5. Sweet 16: The NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament continues Thursday as the next round of playoffs gets underway. Sixteen teams – the Sweet 16 – will play over the next two days as we make our way to the Elite Eight, then the Final Four. The championship game is set for April 3. 

And one more

Nominations for the Daytime Emmy Awards were announce Wednesday. The CBS daytime drama “Young and the Restless” snagged 25 nominations, with ABC’s “General Hospital” and CBS’ “Bold and the Beautiful” getting 23. NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” got 22 nods.

In case you missed it

George Clooney surprises 87-year-old fan at nursing home for her birthday

George Clooney went above and beyond to show one of his fans some love on her 87th birthday.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Photos shared on social media show 87-year-old Pat Adams smiling broadly as Clooney bends down beside her for the photo.

>> Read more trending news

According to the Associated Press, Clooney showed up to the Sunrise of Sonning Retirement and Assisted Living Facility in England with a card and flowers for the elderly resident on her birthday. Clooney received a letter asking if he would make Adams’ dreams come true by paying her a visit.

Linda Jones, who works at the assisted living facility, shared a photo of the encounter on Facebook.

>> See the post here

Who is Adam Schiff? Here are 7 things you may not know about him

California Rep. Adam Schiff grabbed the national spotlight Monday when he was given 15 minutes to present a case accusing President Donald Trump’s campaign of colluding with Russian officials to meddle with the 2016 presidential election.

Schiff, who was elected to Congress in 2000 and is the ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, took the time to lay out a blistering attack against Trump, naming campaign workers and other associates whom he claims have ties that are too close for comfort with various Russian officials and those who support them.

On Wednesday, Schiff was in the spotlight again when he attacked the HPSCI chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes, (R-California), for announcing publicly that it is likely that some of Trump’s communications ended up being “captured” during routine surveillance operations. That information, Nunes said, included names of the people involved in those conversations and those names, he claims, were shared among intelligence organizations. 

Schiff responded with his own press conference, claiming that Nunes had “tainted” the investigation into Russian interference in the election and now only a special prosecutor could fairly look into the accusations.

Who is Adam Schiff and how did he get to this position? Here are a few things you may not know about him.

  1. He is an attorney. He graduated from Harvard. 
  2. He wasn’t a shoo-in for Congress. He lost three elections to the California State House before being elected to the state Senate. He was then elected to the U.S. House in 2001.
  3. He may run for Sen. Diane Feinstein’s Senate seat if she retires in 2018.
  4. As the ranking member of the HPSCI, he’s a member of the “Gang of Eight.” In that role, he is privy to high-level intelligence information. By law, he receives information about intelligence from the White House.
  5. He is on leave from the House Appropriations Committee, and served on the House Select Committee on Benghazi.
  6. He voted for the Patriot Act, and also has sponsored animal rights legislation.
  7. He’s married. His wife’s name is Eve. The couple have two children.

EpiPens recalled abroad due to potential failure to activate

The company behind the EpiPen, a life-saving drug delivery device for severe allergic reactions, recalled some sets of the auto-injector abroad on Monday, although none were recalled in the U.S.

>> Read more trending news

Pharmaceutical company Mylan said in a recall notice that one batch of EpiPens might not work properly. The batch went to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and Japan. The company voluntarily recalled those.

Mylan said that it got two reports worldwide of EpiPens to activate out of a batch of 80,000 devices. The issue came from a defective part, the company said.

Mylan came under fire recently for raising the price of the EpiPen to $600. The cost amounts to a 400 percent increase in price between 2007, when Mylan acquired the devices, and 2016.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Trump’s personal communications captured by intelligence surveillance, House chair says

House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes will be briefing President Donald Trump on Wednesday about some of his personal communications that might have been recorded by investigators through “incidental collection” methods, according to The Associated Press.

"This is a normal, incidental collection, based on what I could collect," Nunes, a Republican from California, said. "This appears to be all legally collected foreign intelligence under" the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

According to a story on CNN, Nunes said he was alerted by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, to the fact that communications had been collected.

Nunes said the intelligence surveillance produced "dozens" of reports that eventually unmasked several individuals’ identities and were "widely disseminated.”

While it is not illegal to unmask a person who has been caught in “incidental collection,” it is a crime to leak classified information. If the communications were gathered by authorization of a FISA warrant, the material would have been classified. 

Nunes said that he does not know if the information was collected at Trump Tower.

Nunes said he called a news conference Wednesday to update the public on information from the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Nunes emphasized at the news conference that the surveillance through which the communications were collected had nothing to do with Russia or any investigation into Russia and the 2016 U.S. elections. 

Nunes' committee heard Monday from FBI director James Comey and National Security Agency director Mike Rogers during a more than five-hour hearing. Comey confirmed that there was an investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian meddling in the presidential election.

Nunes said the collection included Trump transition officials. He also said the collection happened after the election. He said he could not say whether it meant that Trump was "spied on."

"I'm not going to get into legal definitions, but clearly I have a concern," he said.

Photos: Parliament attack in London

Officials believe that a man mowed down several pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer at the Parliament building Wednesday, BBC News reported.

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