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Ethiopian Olympic marathoner might have put his life in danger with protest gesture

Like many other Olympic athletes in the past, Ethiopian marathoner Feyisa Lilesa made a gesture Sunday night when he crossed the finish line in Rio.

But simply making the sign with his arms could have cost the silver medalist his freedom or even his life if he returns home.

He told reporters after the race: "I was protesting for my people. ... If I go back to Ethiopia, maybe they will kill me. If I am not killed, maybe they will put me in prison."

Crossing one's arms over one's head as Lilesa did is a sign used by members of his Oromo tribe to protest the Ethiopian government.

Tensions between the Oromo and the government have been on the rise since last November, when the government announced plans to reallocate Oromo farmland for development.

The announcement sparked intense protests across the nation that lasted for months. 

Officials scrapped the idea in January, but demonstrations flared up once again in recent weeks over protesters who are still being detained. 

And according to a Human Rights Watch report, the government is using violence to stop the protests. The group says more than 400 people have been killed and thousands more injured.

"Oromo is my tribe ... Oromo people now protest (for) what is right, for peace, for a place," Lilesa said in a news conference after his medal ceremony.

Lilesa also said he has family members who are in prison, and "if they talk about democratic rights they are killed."

Lilesa, a father of two, said that because of the violence in his home country, he can't return to Ethiopia after the Olympics. He said he might stay in Brazil or go to Kenya or the U.S. if he can.

An Ethiopian government spokesman said Monday that Lilesa could return to the country and would receive "a heroic welcome," the Associated Press reported.

It's unclear if his post-race gesture will affect his win in Rio. The Olympics committee has stripped athletes of their medals over political statements in the past.

Watch: Usain Bolt interrupts interview to show respect for U.S. anthem

There were many highlights during the Summer Olympics that concluded Sunday night in Rio de Janeiro, and Jamaican runner Usain Bolt provided many of them.

Participating in his third Olympic Games, the record-setting sprinter won three more gold medals on the track. Just as appealing for many is Bolt's over-sized personality and theatrical approach he brings to the sport.

Even with his many memorable moments this year, one moment from the London Olympics is making headlines again.

In 2012, he stopped an interview with Television Espanola to show respect when the "Star-Spangled Banner" began to play.

Bolt asked if the interview was live, and the reporter said that it was, but the Olympian still paused the interview to turn and listen to the American anthem.

When the song finished, Bolt apologized for stopping the interview and then answered the reporter's question.

American pole vaulter Sam Kendricks, who won the bronze in the men’s pole vault earlier this week, acted similarly recently in Rio.

Kendricks, who is listed as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve, stopped mid-run on a jump during a qualifying round for the event.

"Those guys are really proud of me and have given me every chance to continue as a civilian," Kendricks told USA Today. "I am certainly looking to represent the Americans on two fronts, as a military man and as a U.S. athlete. I'm just trying to put my best foot forward for all those soldiers who are watching."

How Olympian Caster Semenya's medical condition became a controversy

Caster Semenya has become the unwilling face of an issue plaguing the Olympics. 

>> Watch the video from Newsy

The South African runner won the gold medal in the women's 800-meter final, beating the next-closest runner by more than a second. 

But she reportedly has a condition called hyperandrogenism, which causes much higher levels of testosterone than women typically have. 

There's speculation other athletes have the condition, as well — and it's led to criticism that they have an unfair advantage.

>> PHOTOS: Closing ceremonies at the Rio Olympics

In 2010, the International Association of Athletics Federations had Semenya sidelined while she underwent gender testing. She was eventually cleared to compete. 

For the 2012 Olympics, athletes with the condition were forced to take drugs that lower testosterone levels, but those rules were thrown out for the Rio Olympics. 

That's because The Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that there was no clear evidence that athletes with hyperandrogenism have an unfair advantage over other athletes. 

Medical experts say hyperandrogenism can affect people in different ways, and athletes with the condition aren't necessarily guaranteed a competitive advantage. 

>> Read more trending stories

But there is still frustration among the athletes. Lynsey Sharp, one of the runners competing against Semenya, said, "Everyone can see it's two separate races, so there's nothing I can do."

Semenya told the BBC that all the criticism is only helping her grow as a person.

"They're making you a better person," she said. "People should learn how to unite. Sport is all about uniting people and not discriminating."

Coach strips to underwear to protest Olympic wrestling match

It's common for emotions to run high during the final seconds of any Olympic event. Sometimes, outcomes are contested.

But one man undressed Sunday afternoon as he contested the final scoring of a wrestling match.

In the 65kg freestyle wrestling bronze medal match, Uzbekistan’s Ikhtiyor Navaruzov beat Mongolia’s Mandakhnaran Ganzorig 8-7 in a match that ended in controversy and two Mongolian coaches taking off their clothes at the Olympic venue.

In the final seconds of the match, Ganzorig led by one and began dancing to celebrate his imminent medal. That celebration didn't last long.

According to The Associated Press, Uzbekistan challenged the scoring. Officials awarded Navaruzov a penalty point, which also gave him the bronze medal because tie matches are decided by the wrestler who last scored a point. 

Then began the unlikely turn of events.

Two Mongolian coaches stormed the mat in protest and began angrily shedding their clothes, with one getting all the way down to his blue briefs while the crowd chanted "Mongolia! Mongolia!"

That led to match officials awarding yet another penalty point.

Police eventually escorted the coaches from the mat.

See video here.

2016 Summer Olympics: Here's the schedule of events for Sunday

It’s been two weeks of ups and downs in Rio, surprises vs. what was expected and, in at least one case, the police were involved.

Today, the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics, which has been a successful one for the United States, is coming to an end. The closing ceremony for the Games will take place Sunday night, but there are still quite a few medals on the line before then.

USA’s men’s basketball team goes for gold against Serbia at 2:30 (ET), and there’s track and field and cycling events left. Rhythmic gymnastics begins at 10 a.m.

Closing ceremonies air on NBC from 8- 10:30 p.m. ET. The broadcast is on a one-hour tape delay. Just prior to that is a one hour special that highlights the best moments from the Games. 

Here’s a look at some of the events set for Sunday.

Channels

The Summer Games are being broadcast on NBC, Telemundo, Bravo, CNBC,MSNBC, NBC Sports Network, the Golf Channel, NBC Universo and USA Network. That’s just for TV. The rest of the coverage is digital. Check here for the TV schedule.

Live streams

Streams will be available on NBCOlympics.com as well as via the NBC Olympics app. Look for the app on iPhones and iPads, Android phones and tablets, Windows phone, Roku streaming boxes, sticks and TVs, Amazon Fire TV and Fire TV sticks, the new Apple TV via the device’s app store, and Chromecast via the NBC Sports iOS or Android app.

Telemundo will stream Spanish-language commentary through its website as well as its Telemundo Desportes apps on Android and on iOS. Again, you’ll be asked for your pay TV account login info.

Sunday's schedule (all times are ET) 

8:30 a.m.: Track and field

8:30 a.m.: Volleyball

9:30 a.m.: Handball

10 a.m.: Rhythmic gymnastics

10:30 a.m.: Basketball

11:30 a.m.: Cycling

11:45 a.m.: Wrestling

12:15 p.m.: Volleyball

1 p.m.: Boxing (Womens)

1 p.m.: Handball

2:30 p.m.: Basketball

8-10:30 p.m. - Closing ceremonies

Photos: Rio Olympics day 15

2016 Summer Olympics: Here's the schedule of events for Saturday

The American men's 1x400-meter relay team was disqualified Friday night after making an illegal baton transfer in the race in which it appeared they had taken a bronze medal. 

The team from Jamaica -- with Usain Bolt running the last leg of the race -- took gold. Bolt said it was the last race of his Olympic career, with the win giving him a total of nine medals.

USA's women's 4x100-meter relay team took first place and the gold medal on Friday. 

Today look for the United States to play Spain for the gold in women's basketball, the finals in rhythmic gymnastics, and the finals in the 1500-meter race.

Here’s a look at some of the events set for Saturday.

Channels

The Summer Games are being broadcast on NBC, Telemundo, Bravo, CNBC,MSNBC, NBC Sports Network, the Golf Channel, NBC Universo and USA Network. That’s just for TV. The rest of the coverage is digital. Check here for the TV schedule.

Live streams

Streams will be available on NBCOlympics.com as well as via the NBC Olympics app. Look for the app on iPhones and iPads, Android phones and tablets, Windows phone, Roku streaming boxes, sticks and TVs, Amazon Fire TV and Fire TV sticks, the new Apple TV via the device’s app store, and Chromecast via the NBC Sports iOS or Android app.

Telemundo will stream Spanish-language commentary through its website as well as its Telemundo Desportes apps on Android and on iOS. Again, you’ll be asked for your pay TV account login info.

Saturday's schedule (all times are ET) 

9 a.m.: Men's Wrestling

10 a.m.: Women's Triathlon

10:40 a.m.: Men's Water Polo

1 p.m.: Women's Boxing

2:30 p.m.: Women's Basketball finals

3:59 p.m.: Rhythmic gymnastics

4:30 p.m.: Men's Soccer

5 p.m.: Modern Pentathlon

8 p.m.: Men's 1500-meter race

What time does Usain Bolt run the 4x100-meter relay Friday night?

If you take Usain Bolt at his word, the Jamaican superstar will likely run his last Olympic race Friday night as he competes in the 4x100-meter relay.

Bolt, who has won two gold medals already – for the 100-meter sprint and the 200-meter sprint – has said that the 2016 Rio Olympics is his last.

The Jamaican team is favored to win the race, and if they do, the medal Bolt gets will be the ninth in his Olympic career.

The 4x100-meter relay is set to start at 9:35 p.m. live on NBC.

Here's more on Usain Bolt:

>Usain Bolt has never run a full mile

>Ellen DeGeneres faces backlash for 'racist' Usain Bolt tweet

What time does Usain Bolt run the 4x100-meter relay Friday night?

If you take Usain Bolt at his word, the Jamaican superstar will likely run his last Olympic race Friday night as he competes in the 4x100-meter relay.

Bolt, who has won two gold medals already – for the 100-meter sprint and the 200-meter sprint – has said that the 2016 Rio Olympics is his last.

The Jamaican team is favored to win the race, and if they do, the medal Bolt gets will be the ninth in his Olympic career.

The 4x100-meter relay is set to start at 9:35 p.m. live on NBC.

Here's more on Usain Bolt:

>Usain Bolt has never run a full mile

>Ellen DeGeneres faces backlash for 'racist' Usain Bolt tweet

Reports: Olympic swimmer James Feigen to pay $10,800, leave Brazil

One of the four U.S. Olympic swimmers embroiled in scandal after an alleged armed robbery in Rio will pay a nearly $11,000 fine to an unnamed charity before leaving Brazil, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending stories

James Feigen's lawyer told The Associated Press the Olympian will pay about $10,800 and leave Brazil Friday amid allegations he and other teammates made up a story about being robbed while in town for the Olympics. Fellow swimmers Gunnar Bentz and Jack Conger have reportedly told Brazilian police that teammate Ryan Lochte lied about the robbery.

Attorney Breno Melaragno told the AP early Friday that Feigen will donate 35,000 Brazilian reals to an unidentified "institution" as part of a deal struck with a Brazilian judge.

>> Related: Report: Teammate claims Lochte fabricated robbery story 

"Melaragno did not specify where the money will go, but the term 'institution' can be taken to mean charity," the wire service reported. "The lawyer said under Brazilian law, a donation can be made to avoid criminal prosecution for minor offenses, but did not say what charge was being contemplated against Feigen."

Melaragno told BBC News the agreement was reached "after a long deliberation" and will mark the end of the case.

"After this donation is done, his passport will be given back to him, and he will be free to return home," he said.

>> Related: What Ryan Lochte said about the Rio robbery

A judge ordered police confiscate Lochte and Feigen's passports as they investigated the alleged crime, which was not reported to police. By that time, Lochte had already left the country, his father said.

Bentz and Conger were pulled off a flight in Rio, questioned and released on Thursday.

A spokesperson for the U.S. Olympic Committee said in a statement earlier this week that Feigen, Lochte, Conger and Bentz were headed to Olympic Village early Sunday when their taxi cab was stopped by armed robbers posing as police officers. The statement was released after Lochte told media outlets the group was robbed after the last Olympic swimming event.

>> Related: Brazil pulls 2 of Ryan Lochte's teammates off plane amid robbery probe

"(They) demanded the athletes' money and other personal belongings," the statement said. "All four athletes are safe and cooperating with authorities."

Brazilian authorities have challenged the report, which was not made to police but came under investigation after media accounts surfaced. Police say the men actually vandalized a gas station bathroom while drunk on Sunday before being questioned by armed guards, paying for the damage and leaving.

>> Related: Twitter mocks Ryan Lochte as his teammates are detained in Rio

The official account was backed up surveillance camera footage, BBC News reported.

Authorities continue to investigate the case.

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