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Marc Summers returning to ‘Double Dare’ reboot in new role, Liza Koshy to host

The new host of Nickelodeon’s reboot of “Double Dare” was announced by the network Tuesday, and it’s not Marc Summers -- although he will be on the show in a new role.

YouTuber and actress Liza Koshy will host the new version of the classic late ‘80s, early ‘90s children’s game show. According to a news release, Marc Summers, the host of the original show, “returns to give color commentary on the challenges, lending his vast knowledge of the game and expertise to each episode.”

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“I can’t think of many shows like ‘Double Dare’ that have the ability to bond people together -- those who grew up watching the original series can now pass along their love for this game show to today’s kids,” Summers said in a statement. “It’s an honor to be a part of this reboot.”

The competition features two teams that compete to win prizes by answering trivia questions, completing messy physical challenges and going through the show’s signature obstacle course, which includes a human hamster wheel and the “Double Dare” giant nose.

“This is a dream that I have been dreaming to live!” Koshy said in a statement. “From watching Double Dare to hosting it!? I am ready for a summer of slime and nose picking.”

The reboot, which consists of 40 new episodes, premieres June 25 at 8 p.m. on Nickelodeon.

Avicii's family says DJ-producer's funeral will be private

The family of late Swedish DJ-producer Avicii says his funeral will be private.

In a statement released Tuesday, Avicii's family says the funeral will include "people who were closest" to the performer. The family also asked the media to respect their decision.

They added that no more information about the funeral will be made publicly.

Avicii, born Tim Bergling, was found dead last month in Muscat, Oman at age 28. He earned Grammy nominations, had success on U.S. radio and performed his music around the world at music festivals.

He retired from touring in 2016. He had in the past suffered acute pancreatitis, in part due to excessive drinking. After having his gallbladder and appendix removed in 2014, he canceled a series of shows in attempt to recover.

For Robert Indiana, 'LOVE' was a complicated relationship

Pop artist Robert Indiana, best known for his 1960s "LOVE" series, died at his secluded island home off the Maine coast having never found the type of lasting love that was celebrated by thousands through his iconic work.

The artist's endearing image of LOVE is instantly recognizable around the world. Couples have their photo taken at the LOVE sculpture in Philadelphia, and the iconic image was used on postage stamps.

But the man behind the art grew up in a household where the word "love" was never spoken, and he never found a lasting relationship, said Barbara Haskell, curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

"The word was never used in his family growing up. He had a complicated relationship with the word," Haskell said.

Indiana died Saturday from respiratory failure at his home in a converted Odd Fellows Hall, a fraternal order lodge, on Vinalhaven Island, 15 miles off the mainland, said James Brannan, his attorney. He was 89.

Friends had expressed concern for his well-being because the reclusive artist had not been heard from for some time.

A lawsuit filed in New York City the day before his death suggested he was purposefully isolated by his caretakers.

Brannan declined to comment on the situation.

Indiana created a lifetime of art but he's best known for LOVE, spelled with two letters to a line and with a tilted "O." It's been transformed into sculptures around the world, sometimes in different languages, from Spain to Israel to Japan.

"In some ways he was perhaps seen as the proverbial one-hit wonder because 'LOVE' was so immensely iconic and immensely huge in pop culture," said Dan Mills, the director at Bates College Museum of Art. "For better or for worse, it overshadowed some of his other contributions."

Haskell compared the image to "American Gothic," the painting by Grant Wood of a man with a pitchfork and a woman in front of a farmhouse . The public knows those images even if they don't know the creators, she noted.

Indiana, who was born Robert Clark in the state of Indiana, left behind the art scene in New York and retreated in 1978 to Maine, living on Vinalhaven.

He told The Associated Press in 2009 that he moved to his house — which a benefactor bought for him — when he needed a place to go after his lease ran out on his five-story studio and gallery in the Bowery section of New York City.

His desire for solitude was legendary.

In 2014, he disappointed dozens of fans by failing to make an appearance outside his home for an event dubbed International HOPE Day, which was inspired by his creativity.

Some of his long-time friends became worried about him in recent months.

Kathleen Rogers, a friend and former publicist, said she was so concerned that six to eight weeks ago she contacted the Maine Department of Health and Human Services to investigate.

She said she wants him to be remembered as an eccentric and inspiring artist, not as a man who shut out friends and closed off his studio.

"He was reclusive, cantankerous and sometimes difficult. But he was a very loyal, loving man. He was the architect of love," she said.

A DHHS spokeswoman did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Although his iconic "LOVE" tended to overshadow everything else, he never stopped producing art. That included fashioning a "HOPE" design, similar to "LOVE," in honor of former President Barack Obama.

The Whitney Museum of American Art staged a 2013 exhibit, "Robert Indiana: Beyond Love." In Maine, Mills was inspired by the Whitney's exhibition to produce a 2016 exhibition, "Robert Indiana: Now and Then."

In the end, Indiana found love through his art and adoration from the public. But real love, Indiana recognized, was a "dangerous commodity" that can die out and lead to disappointment, Haskell said.

"On one hand he accepted that love became a symbol that brought him international renown," she said. "But for him love also has this element of fragility and precariousness."

Woman accuses R. Kelly of sexual battery, giving her herpes

R. Kelly sexually abused and demeaned a woman, locked her in rooms and vehicles for punishment and infected her with herpes, according to a lawsuit that furthers a string of misconduct accusations against the platinum-selling singer.

Faith Rodgers said in the suit filed Monday in New York that the "I Believe I Can Fly" singer "mentally, sexually and verbally" abused her during a roughly yearlong relationship.

Kelly's management team declined to comment Tuesday but previously denied claims that Rodgers made in a police report filed in Dallas in April.

Rodgers' lawsuit includes some of the same allegations and adds to them, painting a portrait of forceful sex, humiliation, unwanted sex tapes and sometimes confinement by one of pop music's best-selling — and most embattled — artists.

Rodgers, 20, said Tuesday on "CBS This Morning" that Kelly, 51, instructed her to call him "daddy" and told her his goal was to teach her how to have sex like a "mature woman."

Her suit comes as Kelly faces growing criticism after years of being accused of troubling conduct toward girls and young women.

The Time's Up campaign against sexual harassment and assault took aim at the R&B singer last month. This month, a Chicago concert was canceled after protests. Spotify removed his music from its promoted playlists and algorithms following a #MuteRKelly social media campaign.

Rodgers said she met the three-time Grammy winner after a March 2017 concert in San Antonio. Two months later, she said he flew her to New York to attend a show.

She told "CBS This Morning" that she "submitted" to sex when he came to her hotel room and demanded she take off her clothes. She said she didn't want to have sex with him but "just froze up."

"He has this type of, like, intimidation right off the bat. You know? So I was just waiting for it to be over," she said.

Her lawsuit says Kelly disregarded her when she said she was "not ready to have sex" with him.

"After initiating non-permissive, painful and abusive sex with plaintiff, defendant, R. Kelly, immediately insulted and criticized" Rodgers "concerning her 'lack of participation' and physical inadequacies," the suit says.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they decide to make their names public, which Rodgers has done.

Kelly is a three-time Grammy winner who has sold close to 30 million albums, with hits including "Ignition," ''I Believe I Can Fly," and "Bump N' Grind."

Kelly has won multiple Grammys, sold close to 30 million albums and has written hits for Michael Jackson, Celine Dion, Aaliyah and more. He has crafted pop anthems and love songs, but he is defined by sexually explicit songs such as "Feelin' on Yo Booty," ''Your Body's Calling Me," ''Sex Me" and even more explicit fare.

He has long been accused of behavior that has ranged from questionable to allegedly criminal.

He wed Aaliyah, then his 15-year-old protege, in 1994. The marriage was later annulled and the two refused to confirm that it happened.

He was later accused of child pornography after a widely circulated videotape appeared to show him having sex with, and urinating on, a teenage girl. He was acquitted of all charges in 2008 and continued to rack up hits and sell out stadiums around the country.

In recent years, a series of women has come forward to accuse him of everything from sexual coercion to physical abuse.

That includes parents who said their daughter was being held by Kelly as part of a sex cult, and a woman who said she was in a long-term abusive relationship with him. Kelly and the girl whose parents came forward denied the allegations against him.

Norman Rockwell 'Four Freedoms' exhibit opens this weekend

An exhibit featuring Norman Rockwell's iconic "Four Freedoms" paintings is opening this weekend.

The New-York Historical Society announced Tuesday that "Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms" will run from May 25 to Sept. 2. It will then tour everywhere from Houston to Normandy, France, by the fall of 2020.

Rockwell's 1943 illustrations, which are among the most famous in American history, were a response to President Franklin Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" speech from two years earlier. The illustrations are called "Freedom of Speech," ''Freedom of Worship," ''Freedom from Fear" and "Freedom from Want."

Reese Witherspoon launching audiobook project

Reese Witherspoon is launching another literary project.

The Oscar-winning actress is collaborating with the audio producer-distributor Audible on audio editions of works highlighted in her Hello Sunshine book club. Witherspoon has recommended Curtis Sittenfeld's story collection "You Think It, I'll Say It" and other works by women. The project with Audible, owned by Amazon.com, will also include original audio productions.

In a statement Tuesday, Witherspoon said she wanted to "expand our book club experience" and also looked forward to working with women narrators. The actress narrated the audio book for one of the most talked-about novels in recent years, Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman."

How To Get Your Royal Wedding Swag Bag

The best thing about attending a royal wedding are the free gift bags. The royal swag was given out to over 2,500 guest. Now, some people are hawking the bags on Ebay. The items in the bag are worth a little over $1,200.

Even if your invite got lost in mail, you to could get a royal bag from Ebay! One is going for over $67,000 right now!

This gift bag from the royal wedding is on eBay for $67,000 pic.twitter.com/4DF0xxCwid — NowThis (@nowthisnews) May 21, 2018

Here’s what’s in the bags

The gift bag that members of the public got at today's #royalwedding pic.twitter.com/RBX4OocDVD — TODAY (@TODAYshow) May 19, 2018

Iowa native Maddie Poppe wins 'American Idol'

Iowa native Maddie Poppe has won "American Idol."

The singer-songwriter bested Caleb Lee Hutchinson and Gabby Barrett in Monday night's two-hour finale on ABC.

Poppe and Hutchinson announced on the program that they're dating, surprising judges Katy Perry, Luke Bryan and Lionel Richie. They then performed "Somewhere Over the Rainbow."

Poppe called the experience incredible.

Hutchinson took to Twitter to congratulate Poppe.

The three judges performed during the finale along with Patti LaBelle, Nick Jonas and Mustard, Bebe Rexha, Darius Rucker, Gary Clark Jr., Yolanda Adams and Kermit the Frog.

Ariana Grande sends love to fans on Manchester anniversary

Ariana Grande shared a message of hope with fans Tuesday as dignitaries, survivors, first responders and the people of Manchester gathered to mark the anniversary of the concert bombing that killed 22 people.

The pop star told survivors and the families of victims that she was "thinking of you all today and every day."

"I love you with all of me and am sending you all of the light and warmth I have to offer on this challenging day," she wrote in a tweet that included a bee, the civic symbol of Manchester.

Salman Abedi, a 22-year-old Briton of Libyan descent, blew himself up as fans were leaving Grande's concert at Manchester Arena on May 22, 2017. Twenty-two concertgoers were killed, and police say more than 800 people were left "with physical and deep psychological injuries."

Across Manchester, a 19th century industrial powerhouse turned diverse and creative modern city, residents made defiant statements of unity in the face of extremist violence.

Some laid bouquets of flowers in St. Ann's Square. Others left hand-written notes on Japanese maples that have been planted to form a "Trees of Hope" trail through the city. One note cited U.S. Episcopal Bishop Michael Curry's sermon at Saturday's royal wedding: "As a clever bishop said 'there is power in love.'"

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said it was a day to "come together."

Thousands of people paused outside Manchester Cathedral at 2:30 p.m. for a minute of silence that was observed across the country, including in Parliament, where lawmakers paused their debates and fell still.

Prince William and Prime Minister Theresa May joined survivors and emergency workers who responded to the attack for a remembrance service at the cathedral.

A choir sang "Amazing Grace" and "Somewhere Over the Rainbow," and Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Sikh, Muslim and humanist leaders all addressed the congregation.

On the altar stood 22 lighted candles, made from the wax of thousands of candles left at St. Ann's Square in the days after the attack.

William read a passage from the Bible's book of Corinthians, ending: "Faith, hope and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love."

Robby Potter, who was hit by shrapnel as he waited to pick his daughter up from the concert, said he felt he had to come to the service "to support the families who have lost people."

"We were very lucky, we know how lucky we are," he told Sky News. "It's a case of standing strong. The country stood strong, especially Manchester."

Later, thousands of people — including a choir of attack survivors — gathered for a concert and sing-song in the city's Albert Square.

"We are showing Manchester and the world that we carry on," said Cath Day of the Manchester Survivors Choir.

After performances by several choirs, the crowd joined in a mass sing-along of tunes including Grande's "One Last Time," ''Look Back In Anger" by Oasis — an unofficial anthem of Manchester after the bombing — and The Beatles' "All You Need is Love."

Bells on the city hall and churches rang out at 10:31 p.m., a year since the bomb exploded.

Police say 100 investigators are still working on the case. The U.K. has issued an arrest warrant for Abedi's younger brother, Hashem Abedi, and is seeking his extradition from Libya — a far-from-straightforward process given that country's political chaos.

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