Now Playing
106.1 BLI

science

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Male birth control gel study: Clinical trial tests new contraceptive

The University of Washington School of Medicine is one of three sites in the United States enrolling couples in the first clinical trial testing the efficacy of male contraception. 

>> Watch the news report here

The contraception, in the form of a gel, is applied to the man's shoulders. The study looks at whether application of the gel can prevent pregnancy for a year. 

>> On ClinicalTrials.gov: Learn more about the clinical trial here

The trial is being conducted jointly by the Population Council, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. 

>> Read more trending news 

According to a news release from UW, studies have shown that more than half of men would use a male contraceptive if it is reversible and uncomplicated. 

Read the news release here.

'Touchdown confirmed': InSight lands on Mars

The InSight lander successfully landed on Mars on Monday, NASA said.

"Touchdown confirmed. InSight is on the surface of Mars!” NASA reported from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

>> Read more trending news 

It was the moment of truth for a NASA project that has been ongoing for six months, the culmination of a 295 million-mile, six-month voyage

Anxiety was high at NASA, which last attempted a landing on the red planet six years ago.

>> Timeline for the InSight lander’s mission

"I am completely excited and completely nervous, all at the same time," InSight project manager Tom Hoffman said Sunday during a news conference at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. "Everything we've done to date makes us feel comfortable and confident we're going to land on Mars. But Mars could always throw us a curve ball.”

NASA launched the InSight lander on May 5. The mission, which cost $850 million, will study the deep interior of Mars and will help scientists understand the formation and early evolution of Mars and other rocky planets, including Earth.

What makes the landing perilous is that the InSight lander must go from 12,300 mph to 5 mph in six minutes, according to Space.com

>> InSight lander mission: Frequently asked questions

During that time, the spacecraft must fire its descent engines, deploy its parachutes, and hopefully land upright on the Martian surface, according to the The Associated Press.

Even after the spacecraft lands, the InSight team won't know that the stationary spacecraft's solar panels have deployed until 8:35 p.m. EST at the earliest, Space.com reported. That’s when NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter will be in position to relay confirmation to Earth. 

Only 40 percent of the missions ever sent to Mars have successfully landed on the planet, and the U.S. is the only nation to land a craft on the surface, NASA officials said. “Since 1965, it (the U.S.) has flown by, orbited, landed on and roved across the surface of the Red Planet.”

Leonid Meteor Shower 2018: 9 must-see photos of the celestial light show

The annual Leonid meteor shower peaked this weekend, offering a stunning natural light show.

>> On AJC.com: Leonid Meteor Shower 2018: How to see this weekend’s celestial spectacle

Skygazers took to social media to share their photos of the celestial phenomenon. Here are some of our favorites:

>> Read more trending news 

1. Llyn Padarn, Snowdonia, Wales, United Kingdom

Photo by @gareth_mon_photography, Instagram

2. South Stack, Wales, United Kingdom

Photo by @bigolivesphoto, Instagram

3. Cannon Beach, Oregon

Photo by @lestertsaiphotography, Instagram

4. Coleman, Alberta, Canada

Photo by @bound_for_mountain, Instagram

5. Blauen, Germany

Photo by Stephane Vetter, Facebook

6. Lone Mountain, Big Sky Resort, Montana

Photo by @davepecunies, Instagram

7. The Rumps, Cornwall, United Kingdom

Photo by @chrisfletcherphotography, Instagram

8. Oregon

Photo by @thezachhayes, Instagram

9. Llyn y Dywarchen, Snowdonia, Wales, United Kingdom

Photo by @_belial, Instagram

Dallas airport workers find fossils more than 11,000 years old

Fossils believed to be more than 11,000 years old were found by two employees of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, KXAS reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Pieces of a mammoth’s tooth and a bison thigh bone were found in a creek at the airport, WFAA reported. 

“Two employees of the airport’s Environmental Affairs Department found the tooth while conducting routine field tests for potential impacts to the environment,” an airport spokesman told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in an email.

The fossils were found on Nov. 2 and 3 by Brandon Burks and Roger Duval, WFAA reported. 

Burks told the television station that he originally thought the fossils were rocks. 

"(They were) completely exposed, you know, it wasn't buried at all, which was interesting," Burks said.

Duval, an amateur fossil hunter, had a stronger reaction.

“He kind of put them together and was like, 'You know what, this could be a mammoth tooth,'" Burks told WFAA. "We kind of freaked out."

The fossils will be moved from the airport to SMU for cataloguing and further study, the television station reported.

NASA releases first 8K video from space

Views beamed to Earth from outer space are spectacular, but NASA is making them even more breathtaking. 

>> Read more trending news 

NASA released the first 8K video from space, after filming the astronauts living and working on the International Space Station.

The Helium 8K camera was created by RED, a digital cinema company. It can shoot video at resolutions ranging from conventional HDTV up to 8,192 pixels by 4,320 pixels, NASA said in a news release. The average HD television projects resolutions of 1,920 pixels by 1,080 pixels, while screens at digital theaters can project resolutions between 2K and 4K, NASA said.

“This new footage showcases the story of human spaceflight in more vivid detail than ever before,” Dylan Mathis, communications manager for the International Space Station Program at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, said in a release. “The world of camera technology continues to progress, and seeing our planet in high fidelity is always welcome. We're excited to see what imagery comes down in the future.”

You can watch some of the video here.

NASA discovers perfectly formed, rectangular ice sheet

A perfectly formed, rectangular ice sheet was spotted during a flyover in Antarctica on Oct. 16, NASA reported.’

>> Read more trending news 

The flyover was part of Operation IceBridge, which is NASA’s aerial survey of polar ice. It originated from Punta Arenas, Chile, on Oct. 10. During the mission last week, senior support scientist Jeremy Harbeck spotted the sharply angular iceberg floating just off the Larsen C ice shelf.

“I thought it was pretty interesting; I often see icebergs with relatively straight edges, but I've not really seen one before with two corners at such right angles like this one had,” Harbeck said in a statement

The iceberg appears to be calved from Larsen C. In July 2017, it released a chunk of ice the size of the state of Delaware, NASA said.

“I was actually more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were about to fly over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and fairly photogenic, so on a lark, I just took a couple photos,” Harbeck said.

The flight is scheduled to end Nov. 18, NASA said.

How you can watch Orionid meteor shower, which peaks this weekend

The dazzling Orionid meteor shower is expected to peak at the tail end of this weekend and you don’t want to miss out on the much-anticipated celestial event.

The annual shower has been called “one of the most beautiful showers of the year” by Bill Cooke, head of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office, and is a popular celestial event for stargazers everywhere.”

Here are 11 things you need to know about the 2018 Orionid meteor shower:

Why are these meteor showers called Orionids?

The meteors radiate (or originate) from a region close to the constellation Orion the Hunter.

What causes the meteor shower?

According to Space.com, the meteor’s particles come from Comet 1P, also known as  Halley’s Comet, which zips by the planet every 75 to 76 years.

As the comet passes Earth, it leaves behind “a trail of comet crumbs,” and every now and then, the Earth’s orbit around the sun crosses paths with the comet’s debris.

What’s the difference between a meteoroid, meteor and meteorite. anyway?

Cooke told Space.com that a meteoroid is essentially space debris. For example, the crumbs from Halley’s Comet are meteoroids.

Once the meteoroids enter Earth’s atmosphere, they become meteors (or shooting stars).

Though most meteors disintegrate before hitting the ground, meteors that do strike the surface of the planet are called meteorites, Cooke said.

How fast will the Orionids be?

According to Cooke, some will zoom at speeds up to 148,000 mph in relative speed — less than 4 mph slower than the Leonids.

When will it peak?

The Orionid shower will peak between Sunday, Oct. 21, and Monday, Oct. 22 this year, but you may be able to catch a meteor or two before then.

Peak visibility is around 2 a.m.

Orionid meteors usually fly between Oct. 2 to Nov. 7 each year.

How many meteors will I see?

According to EarthSky.org, you can expect to see up to 15-20 meteors per hour during peak time.

Where do I have to go to watch the meteor showers?

The meteor shower will be visible from anywhere on the planet, but be sure to go somewhere far from city lights.

How to find the shape of Orion the Hunter

The meteor shower will radiate from Orion’s sword, which is slightly north of the star Betelgeuse.

According to Space.com, it could be helpful or just educational to find the shape of Orion the Hunter as you get settled for the show.

But staring straight at the point of origin won’t do much for you, Cooke said. That’s because “meteors close to the radiant have short trails and are harder to see — so you want to look away from Orion.”

Your best bet is to simply look up at the vast, dark sky.

GLOBE at Night has a nifty Orion Finder Chart that will show you Orion based on your location, for anyone interested.

From globeatnight.org:

The easiest way to find Orion is to go outside in the evening and look in the southwest sky if you are in the northern hemisphere or the northwestern sky if you are in the southern hemisphere. If you live on or near the equator, he will be visible in the western sky. You are looking for three bright stars close together in an almost-straight line. These three stars represent Orion's belt. The two bright stars to the north are his shoulders and the two to the south are his feet. 

Do I need binoculars?

According to Space.com, binoculars and telescopes won’t actually help. That’s because those tools are designed to magnify and focus on stationary objects in the sky.

The naked eye will do just fine.

How to safely watch the shower

Space.com recommends heading outdoors around 1:30 a.m. and letting your eyes adjust to the darkness for about 20 minutes.

Climate change could cause beer shortage, scientists warn

Last week, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that if governments don’t act on climate change within 12 years, there will be additional threats to the global environment.

>> On AJC.com: We have 12 years left to act on climate change, UN warns

Scientists have linked global warming to such environmental events as escalated intensity of hurricanes and melting Arctic ice. Now, a new study from climate researchers in the United States, China and Britain suggests a beer shortage is brewing due to climate change.

>> Read more trending news 

The report, published in the journal Nature Plants, warns that drought and heat will impact barley production, though only 17 percent of the world’s barley is used for beer. But in the United States, Brazil and China, at least two-thirds of the barley goes into six-packs, drafts, kegs, cans and bottles.

>> On AJC.com: How climate change could cause 26,000 more US suicides by 2050

Using a process-based crop model and an economic model, the researchers examined the effects of heat waves and drought, not the general warming that will also affect where barley is grown.

That means beer prices on average would double, even adjusting for inflation. In countries like Ireland, where cost of a brew is already high, prices could triple. Beer is currently the most popular alcoholic drink by volume consumed.

>> On AJC.com: Is chocolate really going extinct because of climate change?

“Although not the most concerning impact of future climate change, climate-related weather extremes may threaten the availability and economic accessibility of beer,” researchers wrote.

“Our aim is not to encourage people to drink more beer now,” study author Dabo Guan of Beijing’s Tsinghua University told the New York Times. “Climate change mitigation is the only way. Everybody in the world needs to fight.”

>> On AJC.com: Climate change will internally displace 143 million people by 2050, scientists warn

As The Associated Press reported: “If emissions of heat-trapping gases from the burning of coal, oil and gas continue at the current rising pace, the likelihood of weather conditions hurting barley production will increase from about once a decade before 2050 to once every other year by the end of the century.”

Read the full study at nature.com.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Astronomers find evidence of moon outside solar system

Aided by the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers said Wednesday they have found evidence of the first known moon outside the solar system, according to NASA.

>> Read more trending news 

The first “exomoon” is as large as Neptune and is more than 8,000 light years away from Earth. It is located in the Cygnus constellation and orbits a gas-giant planet that revolves around a star called Kepler 1625, NASA said.

The study team cautioned that more confirmation is needed, Science magazine reported.

“This intriguing finding shows how NASA’s missions work together to uncover incredible mysteries in our cosmos,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “If confirmed, this finding could completely shake up our understanding of how moons are formed and what they can be made of.”

While searching for exomoons, Columbia University astronomers Alex Teachey and David Kipping analyzed data from 284 Kepler-discovered planets, NASA said. The researchers found an example in planet Kepler-1625b that suggested the presence of a moon.

“We saw little deviations and wobbles in the light curve that caught our attention,” Kipping said.

The astronomers hope to make more observations on the possible exomoon in May and have requested time on the Hubble telescope, Science reported.

“It’s exciting to see the hunt for the first exomoon continue, and with what would be a shockingly large moon,” Sara Seager, an astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute Technology, wrote in an email to Science.

Which personality type are you? New study reveals 4 core groupings

You may be familiar with Myers-Briggs’ 16 different personality types, but new research published this week in the journal Nature Human Behavior shows there are four distinct personality clusters most individuals around the globe adhere to best.

>> On AJC.com: Hate those job personality tests? Here's how to hack them

Psychologists and engineers at Northwestern University in Illinois sought to “develop an alternative approach to the identification of personality types” from the existing methods, many of which have led to inconclusive results. 

Their research included 1.5 million participants around the globe who answered 44 to 300-question surveys over a span of several decades.

>> On AJC.com: 7 ways introverts can succeed on their strengths in the workplace

Using participant responses and computer-generated algorithms, the researchers grouped together buckets of people with matching Big Five OCEAN traits: extroversion, neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness and agreeableness — traits first endorsed and then widely accepted by the scientific community in the 1990s.

Here’s how the scientists defined each trait:
  • Neuroticism: The tendency to frequently experience negative emotions such as anger, worry and sadness, as well as being interpersonally sensitive. 
  • Extraversion: The tendency to be talkative, sociable and enjoy others; the tendency to have a dominant style.
  • Openness: The tendency to appreciate new art, ideas, values, feelings and behaviors.
  • Agreeableness: The tendency to agree and go along with others, rather than assert one's own opinions and choices.
  • Conscientiousness: The tendency to be careful, on time for appointments, to follow rules and to be hard working.

>> On AJC.com: 7 struggles every extrovert understands

At first, the researchers noticed 16 personality clusters overall, but after additional constraints, they narrowed them down to four: average, reserved, role model and self-centered.

The results suggested an individual’s personality type could also shift as they aged. For example, older people tend to lose the neuroticism and gain conscientiousness and agreeableness.

Things to know about each personality type

Average

  • High scores in neuroticism and extraversion
  • Low scores on openness
  • Most common personality type

Reserved

  • Have some of the least socially desirable traits
  • Typically score low when it comes to openness and neuroticism
  • Only cluster with little dependence on age and gender
  • Typically extroverted, but agreeable

Role model

  • Tend to be among the most stable
  • Good leaders, dependable and open to new ideas
  • Have high scores in all traits but neuroticism 
  • Strongly overrepresented group: Age 40 and older
  • Slightly underrepresented group: Age 21 and younger

Self-centered

  • Have some of the least socially desirable traits
  • Typically score low when it comes to openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness
  • Score high in extraversion
  • Strongly overrepresented group: Young males
  • Underrepresented: Women age 15 and up

You can take this online quiz to contribute to the research.

Don’t feel like you fit into one single cluster? No big deal. All the researchers are suggesting is “you can group more people in these four clusters than you’d expect by chance,” study co-author William Revelle wrote in a university article.

>> On AJC.com: Character traits you wouldn't believe give you an edge in your career

Study limitations

While the data is robust, researchers note their samples are not representative of the population. The research also doesn’t conclusively answer the minimum number of items needed to reliably assess personality types.

Still, the data, researchers said, showed there are certainly higher densities of certain personality types.

>> Read more trending news 

“People have tried to classify personality types since Hippocrates’s time, but previous scientific literature has found that to be nonsense,” Revelle said. “The data came back, and they kept coming up with the same four clusters at higher densities than you'd expect by chance, and you can show by replication that this is statistically unlikely. The methodology is the main part of the paper's contribution to science.”

Researchers hope their findings can benefit mental health professionals, hiring managers or even folks looking for a partner in life.

Read the full study at nature.com.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >
 

Amazon Alexa

Enable our Skill today to listen live at home on your Alexa Devices!