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Posted: June 08, 2018

Who is Anthony Bourdain’s girlfriend, Asia Argento?


By Ana Santos, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

Asia Argento, an Italian actress, filmmaker and activist, said she is “beyond devastated” by the news of the death of her boyfriend, Anthony Bourdain.

Bourdain, an American chef, author and television personality who hosted “Parts Unknown,” was found dead in his hotel room in France, CNN reported Friday. He was 61. 

>> Read more trending news

In a statement posted to Twitter, Argento remembered Bourdain as brilliant, fearless and generous.

“Anthony gave all of himself in everything that he did,” the actress wrote. “His brilliant, fearless spirit touched and inspired so many, and his generosity knew no bounds. He was my love, my rock, my protector. I am beyond devastated. My thoughts are with his family. I would ask that you respect their privacy and mine.”


 

Who is Asia Argento?

Argento is an actress, filmmaker, director, author and activist.

Argento was born Sept. 20, 1975, in Rome, Italy. Her full name is Asia Aria Maria Vittoria Rossa Argento.

Argento is the daughter of Dario Argento and Daria Nicolodi. Her father, Dario, was an actor, writer, producer and director, and her mother, Daria, was a stage actress and writer.

Argento has appeared in dozens of films, including “Land of the Dead,” “B. Monkey,” “Marie Antoinette” and “xXx.” She directed many films, including “Scarlet Diva” and “The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things,” both of which she also wrote and starred in.

Argento has two children, Anna Lou and Nicola. Argento married filmmaker Michele Civetta in 2008 and have one son, Nicola Giovanni, together. The couple divorced in 2013.

Argento and Bourdain publicly announced their romantic relationship in 2017. Bourdain told PEOPLE in 2017 that Argento was “enormously helpful and inspiring.” Argento influenced Bourdain’s CNN show, “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown,” by appearing in one episode about Rome and directing an episode about Hong Kong


It’s a wrap! #Firenze @partsunknowncnn @anthonybourdain #makearteveryday

A post shared by asiaargento (@asiaargento) on

Argento is part of the #MeToo movement and  accused film producer Harvey Weinstein of rape. She spoke out last October in The New Yorker. In an op-ed published in April titled “I refuse to be silenced,” Argento wrote that “The balance of power tipped, at last, in favor of the survivors who have been given a voice and platform to speak their truths to the world.”


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Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61

Anthony Bourdain, an American chef, author, and television personality who hosted “Parts Unknown,” was found dead in his hotel room, CNN reported Friday. He was 61. 

Bourdain was found in his hotel room in Strasbourg, France, CNN reported.

The Emmy-winning host committed suicide, CNN confirmed.

>> Read more trending news 

>> Related: Notable deaths 2018

"It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain," CNN said in a statement Friday morning. "His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller. His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much. Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time."

Bourdain was in France to work on an upcoming episode of “Parts Unknown,” an award-winning series on CNN. His friend, French chef Eric Ripert, found Bourdain unresponsive in his hotel room, CNN reported.

>> Twitter reacts to the death of Anthony Bourdain

The eleventh season of "Parts Unknown" premiered on CNN last month.

Bourdain won a Peabody Award in 2013 for “expanding our palates and horizons in equal measure," CNN reported.

“I want to extend my heartfelt condolences to his family,” President Donald Trump said as he prepared to attend the G7 summit in Canada. “I enjoyed his show. He was a character.” 

Bourdain's death occurred three days after fashion designer Kate Spade hanged herself at her Manhattan apartment on Tuesday.

The 24-hour telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK).

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  The memorable first time Anthony Bourdain visited Waffle House
  Suicide rate up across the country, CDC says

World reacts to death of Anthony Bourdain

When news broke that Anthony Bourdain was found dead in his hotel room in France, friends, coworkers and fans went to social media to mourn, reacting to his death.

CNN confirmed Bourdain’s cause of death as suicide. He was the host of CNN’s series “Parts Unknown.” Eric Ripert, a chef and friend of Bourdain, found him unresponsive in his hotel room Friday morning, CNN reported. Bourdain was in France filming a new episode of the series.

>>Read: Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61

The reaction on social media varied from thoughts and prayers to asking why.

>> Read more trending news 

  Photos: Notable deaths 2018

Anthony Bourdain: Chef influenced food world with 'Kitchen Confidential', 'Parts Unknown'

Antony Bourdain was known as a chef and television host who didn’t pull punches. He spoke his mind, unfiltered, no matter the subject or who he would anger.

He was a best-selling author and a television personality. 

>> Read more trending news 

Bourdain was found dead in a French hotel room after committing suicide, CNN reported. He was 61.

>>Read: World reacts to death of Anthony Bourdain

A look back at the life of the world-renowned chef, author and TV host, according to Biography.com:

>>Read: Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61

Bourdain admitted a past addiction to drugs and alcohol. In his book, “Kitchen Confidential” he outlined his battles with drugs including LSD, cocaine and heroin. He said he sold his record collection to buy drugs, Fox News reported.

>>Read: Twitter reacts to the death of Anthony Bourdain, star of “Parts Unknown”

  Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61
  /video/hot-video/anthony-bourdain-dead/
  Photos: Anthony Bourdain through the years
  World reacts to death of Anthony Bourdain
  Photos: Notable deaths 2018

The memorable first time Anthony Bourdain visited Waffle House

Famed chef and television personality Anthony Bourdain was found dead Friday morning in a hotel room in France. The cause of death was suicide, CNN reported.

The following article was written by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 2015.

CNN food critic and world traveler Anthony Bourdain had never eaten at a Waffle House.

CNN’s “Parts Unknown” host made a career out of visiting some of the world’s most eccentric locales and eating whatever the local populace will put on a plate, stick or shingle.

>> Read more trending news 

The worst thing he’s ever eaten? Fermented shark in Iceland, which somehow beat out maggot fried rice and raw seal eyes

The best? Could it be a pecan waffle from Waffle House?

Bourdain visited a South Carolina Waffle House back in 2015 with southern chef Sean Brock, who said he has visited the roadside eatery since he was a young because he enjoys watching food being prepared.

Brock, from Charleston, apparently has the two-sided menu implanted in his DNA and instructs the man who has tasted everything to get a pecan waffle. He then shows him how to slather a butter-like substance into every waffle grid and soak it in syrup.

Bourdain’s review? He says Waffle House is “indeed marvelous” but seems as captivated by the late-night lunacy as the food.

>>Watch video: Viewer discretion advised

In the opening of the video, the famous chef (and imbiber of adult beverages) offers up high praise, calling the familiar diner a “yellow beacon of hope” for the “seriously hammered.”

Customers of all races, creeds and “degrees of inebriation” seem welcome, he says. “It never closes” and “is always there for you.”

Waffle House not only has delicious grub, but it’s a “place of safety and nourishment” for all, says Bourdain, who may have been consuming something fermented other than Icelandic shark while putting this piece together.

“That’s good,” exclaims Bourdain as he stuffs some waffle in his face.

Brock, in referencing a famous French restaurant in California, says “You don’t come here expecting The French Laundry” … “you expect something amazing.”

“This is better than The French Laundry,” says Bourdain, who may have trouble getting a reservation the next time he is in Napa.

But, with 2,100 Waffle Houses in the U.S., he probably won’t go hungry.

  Anthony Bourdain: Chef influenced food world with 'Kitchen Confidential', 'Parts Unknown'
  Chef, author, TV star Anthony Bourdain dead at 61
  World reacts to death of Anthony Bourdain
Suicide rate up across the country, CDC says

Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Suicide rate up across the country, CDC says

The United States experienced a nearly 30 percent increase in suicide rates between 1999-2016, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released two days after the death of designer Kate Spade. Her death was ruled a suicide.

On Friday, chef, author and TV personality Anthony Bourdain was also reported dead. CNN confirmed the cause of death was suicide.

>> Read more trending news

According to the recently published figures, 54 percent of reported suicide deaths since 1999 could not be traced back to mental health diagnoses. Circumstances involving relationships, substance abuse, job or financial troubles, health issues and access to lethal means, such as firearms, significantly contributed to the dramatic rise, the CDC reported.

Still, experts note that previous research has shown higher rates of mental health disorders among those at high risk of suicide.

“The reason most suicide decedents don’t have a known mental disorder is that they were never diagnosed, not that they didn’t have one,” Dr. David Brent, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, told the New York Times.

If you or anyone you know is contemplating suicide, or if you are concerned for someone else, here are some helpful resources: 

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (24 hours)

Call 1-800-273-8255

Online chat

Suicide prevention resources for parents, guardians and families

Suicide prevention resources for teens

Suicide prevention resources for survivors of suicide loss

More resources and programs at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center.

Read the full CDC report at cdc.gov.

3 women accuse Harvey Weinstein of rape: report

Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

3 women accuse Harvey Weinstein of rape: report

Three women accused film producer Harvey Weinstein of forcing them into sexual acts in an expose published Tuesday -- accusations that the Hollywood giant denied in a statement through one of his representatives.

>> Read more trending news

The allegations came to light just days after The New York Times detailed complaints of sexual harassment spanning decades against the Miramax co-founder. Weinstein acknowledged the accusations in a statement to the newspaper last week and vowed to “deal with this issue head on.”

In a report published Tuesday by The New Yorker, former aspiring actress Lucia Evans, Italian actress Asia Argento and a woman who was not identified told the magazine that they were forced into sexual acts with Weinstein. Evans told the magazine that she was assaulted by Weinstein in 2004, while Argento said she was assaulted in 1997. The New Yorker did not say when the third alleged attack took place.

In a statement issued to The New Yorker, a spokeswoman for Weinstein, Sallie Hofmeister, denied the accusations.

“Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein,” she said. “Mr. Weinstein obviously can’t speak to anonymous allegations, but with respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual. Mr. Weinstein has begun counseling, has listened to the community and is pursuing a better path. Mr. Weinstein is hoping that, if he makes enough progress, he will be given a second chance.”

Actresses Mira Sorvino and Rosanna Arquette told The New Yorker that they suspected that Weinstein kept them from working in Hollywood after they rejected his advances. Hofmeister denied the allegation.

Four women, including Filipina-Italian model Ambra Battilana Gutierrez, told The New Yorker that Weinstein touched them inappropriately in a way that could be construed as assault.

Guitierrez said she went to the New York Police Department after Weinstein groped her in 2015, according to The New Yorker. He admitted to grabbing her without consent in an audio recording taken by the model for police, but no charges were filed against Weinstein.

Weinstein was ousted from his position with The Weinstein Company on Sunday amid fallout from the sexual harassment allegations uncovered by The New York Times. Multiple celebrities have come out in support of Weinstein’s accusers in the wake of the report.

Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

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Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

In wake of mounting sexual harassment and assault allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein, Alyssa Milano tweeted a call to victims to share their stories. 

“If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet,” the actress wrote in October.

The hashtag spread far and wide, but Milano isn’t the originator of using the phrase to bring attention to these stories. That credit belongs to Tarana Burke, a New York-based sexual assault, abuse and exploitation activist.

>> Read more trending news

“It's not about a viral campaign for me,” Burke told CNN Oct. 17. “It’s about a movement.”

CNN reported that Burke began the movement -- the genesis of which happened in 1996 -- when she was a youth camp director and heard a young girl’s story of abuse.

“For the next several minutes this child ... struggled to tell me about her ‘stepdaddy’ or rather her mother’s boyfriend who was doing all sorts of monstrous things to her developing body…” Burke wrote on the Just Be youth organization website. “I was horrified by her words, the emotions welling inside of me ran the gamut, and I listened until I literally could not take it anymore…which turned out to be less than 5 minutes. Then, right in the middle of her sharing her pain with me, I cut her off and immediately directed her to another female counselor who could ‘help her better...’

“I could not muster the energy to tell her that I understood, that I connected, that I could feel her pain,” she wrote, later adding, “I watched her put her mask back on and go back into the world like she was all alone and I couldn’t even bring myself to whisper…me too.”

Burke told CNN she began the movement to help young women of color who survived sexual exploitation, abuse and assault. 

“It started with young people and I quickly realized adults needed it too,” she said. “When you experience trauma and meet other people that have a similar experience, and you show empathy for each other, it creates a bond.”

#MeToo continues to be tweeted and shared on other social media spaces, including Facebook and Instagram. 

“Somebody asked me, does this (campaign) amplify your work? And it does in a certain way, but also when this hashtag dies down, and people thinking about it, I'll still be doing the work,” Burke told the Los Angeles Times

“I think the viral moment is great but the amplification of that -- I worry about disclosing their status as survivors en masse on social media and not having space to process,” she told CNN. “I worry about survivors coming on to social media and being bombarded with messages of ‘me too.”

Milano has since tweeted that she was made aware of the origin of the movement. “(T)he origin story is equal parts heartbreaking and inspiring,” she wrote with a link to the Just Be website.

Before then, some were critical, Ebony magazine reported. To a number of women of color on Twitter, Milano’s elevation of #MeToo and the day-long Twitter boycott following Rose McGowan’s temporary account deactivation ignored the fact that black women and other women of color are excluded from conversations. 

“Where was the boycott when actress and comedian Leslie Jones was harassed by trolls to the point of deleting her account for months?” writer Ashley C. Ford wrote in a Refinery29 essay.

“I think that women of color use social media to make our voices heard with or without the amplification of White women,” Burke told Ebony. “I also think that many times when White women want our support, they use an umbrella of ‘women supporting women’ and forget that they didn’t lend the same kind of support.”

“I don’t think it was intentional but somehow sisters still managed to get diminished or erased in these situations,” she added. “A slew of people raised their voices so that that didn’t happen.”

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